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angrytrucker78
12-10-2006, 09:34 AM
Which bit do you use to make the speaker cutout? And is a 1/2" roundover good enough to round port walls and round the outside of the box? The 3/4 roundovers only seem to have a 1/2 shank and I'm not sure if my router will accept.

envengineer
12-10-2006, 10:18 AM
I use a 1/4" downspiral bit for making the cutouts (just remember to use a pilot hole). Others use an upspiral but I like to be able to see what I'm doing if I make freehand cuts and the downspiral allows me to see my lines perfectly and I don't have to switch bits.

Rawr-DQ
12-10-2006, 10:18 AM
You use a straight bit to do cut-outs. And you'll also want to make or buy a circle jig.

bjfish11
12-10-2006, 11:26 AM
I also use a 1/4" upspiral bit for cutting the holes. For roundovers, I use a 3/8" roundover bit. Here is why. When you get to the end of your port, and want to round over port sides, if you use anything bigger than 3/8" with will be oblonged. 3/8" x2 =3/4, which happens to be wood thickness. Theoretically you could use a bigger roundover for the front of the box, thats just up to you.

angrytrucker78
12-10-2006, 12:16 PM
Thanks. So the spiral bit would just be something like a roto-zip would use, doesn't have to be router specific correct? I'm gonna start building this today and just making sure I have everything I need.
http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a374/angrytrucker78/00151_01.png

bjfish11
12-10-2006, 12:35 PM
Correct, its just a different kind of straight cutting bit. Similar to a drill bit sort of. I think it works alittle better than a regular straight bit.

davidfre21
12-10-2006, 12:38 PM
upspiral bits are killer...

And u might end up with a few round over bits, depending on what ur rounding. Also buy quality bits.

davidfre21
12-10-2006, 12:38 PM
get a jasper jig also

bjfish11
12-10-2006, 01:02 PM
upspiral bits are killer...

And u might end up with a few round over bits, depending on what ur rounding. Also buy quality bits.
x2


get a jasper jig also
x2


Both of these suggestions will make it MUCH easier. And you will be able to build quality boxes, faster for a long time.

helotaxi
12-10-2006, 02:09 PM
I use a spiral upcut bit as well. They are router bits similar in design to a Roto-zip it but really more akin to an end mill used for metal machining. Benefits to a spiral upcut vs others for jig work: it loads the bit vertically instead of laterally like a straight cut bit. The result is less tool deflection and more accurated cuts. You also don't get tool chatter. It clears the chip out of the hole as it cuts, keeping the cutters clear reducing the chance of burning up the bit or the work. It plunge cuts unlike a down cut bit. A down cut bit also can only be used for through cuts and can't cut channels and pockets. It pushes the chips into the hole and will burn almost immediately if there is nowhere for them to go. To be able to see what you're doing for free hand work, get a dust collection attachment.

The only drawback to using an upcut bit is that you MUST have the bit collet correctly tightened. The bit pulls itself into the work and will pull loose from the collect and into your work surface if you let it. I check the bit before every cut, and now that my collet is worn as well, I closely monitor the bit as I go. If it stops cutting easily, I kill the router and check the bit. The wings on my saw table have a few scars from spiral bits working loose.

angrytrucker78
12-10-2006, 02:43 PM
Thanks for the help. I just ordered a Jasper Jig, and I'm gonna head up to HD or Lowes and pick up a spiral bit and a 3/8 roundover.

helotaxi
12-10-2006, 04:48 PM
Depending on how good the tool guy is at HD or Lowes there, they may not know what a Spiral Upcut bit is. Also make sure you know what size collet your router has and get the right size shank.

davidfre21
12-10-2006, 04:51 PM
another cool bit to look into is a flushcut. Nothing looks finer than perfect edges :D

baseballer1100
12-10-2006, 04:53 PM
I also use a 1/4" upspiral bit for cutting the holes. For roundovers, I use a 3/8" roundover bit. Here is why. When you get to the end of your port, and want to round over port sides, if you use anything bigger than 3/8" with will be oblonged. 3/8" x2 =3/4, which happens to be wood thickness. Theoretically you could use a bigger roundover for the front of the box, thats just up to you.

Did that today. Looked weird.

davidfre21
12-10-2006, 04:55 PM
Did that today. Looked weird.

pwnt

iamamp3pimp
12-10-2006, 11:43 PM
Flush trim.

Now this spiral upcut bit...you can cut full circles in one pass with it?

bjfish11
12-10-2006, 11:44 PM
Flush trim.

Now this spiral upcut bit...you can cut full circles in one pass with it?

Yes, but I wouldnt do it. It will kill your router faster.

davidfre21
12-10-2006, 11:44 PM
Now this spiral upcut bit...you can cut full circles in one pass with it?

if its a good enough bit and your router is strong enough

i usualy made circle in 2-3 passes, just to take it easy on the tools

bjfish11
12-10-2006, 11:50 PM
if its a good enough bit and your router is strong enough

i usualy made circle in 2-3 passes, just to take it easy on the tools

;) Beat ya.

baseballer1100
12-10-2006, 11:54 PM
pwnt

indeed.

angrytrucker78
12-11-2006, 12:15 AM
Well I bought a router, 3/8 roundover, 1/4 spiral up cut, 1" flush bit, and jasper jig today. I should be breathing MDF dust soon.

iamamp3pimp
12-11-2006, 12:57 AM
take that 1 inch flush trim bit back.

1/2 is more than enough....lol

phatcat600
12-11-2006, 02:42 AM
Hmm so I need a router to cut the hole for my sub? I had my uncle do the straight cuts with a tablesaw and I was going to do the circle with a jigsaw, how perfect do they have to be?

bjfish11
12-11-2006, 08:34 AM
take that 1 inch flush trim bit back.

1/2 is more than enough....lol
Well, 1" works good so you only have to make 1 pass. :)


Hmm so I need a router to cut the hole for my sub? I had my uncle do the straight cuts with a tablesaw and I was going to do the circle with a jigsaw, how perfect do they have to be?

Jig saw is fine. It doenst have to be perfect. Router with a jig is just a lot faster. But either will work just fine.

helotaxi
12-11-2006, 11:47 AM
If you let the bit do the cutting and don't force it through the work, you can consistently make single pass cuts without any extra strain on the router with a spiral bit. I wouldn't try it with a straight cut bit, you'll either burn it up, break it or both. Doing it in one pass will also make for a cleaner edge on the cut.

As far as the flush trim bit goes, 1/2" is a lot easier on the router motor and once again, as long as you let the bit do the work, single pass flush trims are not an issue. I've done full profile pattern cuts with a 1/2' flush bit.

iamamp3pimp
12-11-2006, 04:25 PM
Well, 1" works good so you only have to make 1 pass. :)



Jig saw is fine. It doenst have to be perfect. Router with a jig is just a lot faster. But either will work just fine.

im thinking 1/2 in diameter......

mine is 1/2 in diameter, and one inch long

iamamp3pimp
12-11-2006, 04:25 PM
im thinking 1/2 in diameter......

mine is 1/2 in diameter, and one inch long

My flush trim bit that is

angrytrucker78
12-11-2006, 04:27 PM
My flush trim bit that is

:eyebrow:

helotaxi
12-11-2006, 09:09 PM
My flush trim bit that is

Cause you can't have your bit bigger than your tool... :D

iamamp3pimp
12-12-2006, 04:43 PM
thats right!



lol