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ewoevo
12-05-2006, 08:24 PM
Well, I have a set of Alpine SPX-177A's (6.5) in my car right now. They sound really good. However, I have a set of JL XR650 Csi's sitting in my garage. Are the JL's much, if any better, or should I just leave the Alpines installed? Someone with experience with both please chime in. Just for info, my car is an 06 EVO and I'm running Type R 6.5 coaxes in the rear. I haven't installed my sub yet (HC12) but hope to soon. I'm using an Avionixx 440.4 to run the speakers. Also have an Eclipse 8455 H/U.

Thanks in advance!

azbass
12-05-2006, 08:26 PM
if they sound good leave em,. the jl's probably sound the same.

bdawson72
12-05-2006, 08:27 PM
what he said

Towncar
12-05-2006, 09:33 PM
um.. swap them out for yourself, and see which one you like the best?

azbass
12-05-2006, 09:36 PM
what he said

ryanbssc29
12-05-2006, 11:02 PM
If you do decide to swap please tell me, pm or post, b.c I am debating between thoes two speakers. Also have you ever heard the diamond d6 comps? If so how do they compare to your type xs?

DaFreakinRican0
12-06-2006, 01:19 AM
If you do decide to swap please tell me, pm or post, b.c I am debating between thoes two speakers. Also have you ever heard the diamond d6 comps? If so how do they compare to your type xs?

Im also in the same boat. Wondering how the d6's sound. Im thinking about getting the Type X's. Does anyone know if Tweeter carries Diamond??? I wouldnt buy there, I just need to hear these and there is a Tweeter near by. A local dealer sells them, but has no displays up :rolleyes:

Notwerk
12-06-2006, 04:05 AM
Swap them out and see what you like. They're about on the same level. I prefer the Alpines because of the tweeter. Not a fan of metal domes, even though the JLs are tamer than most. But those ring-dome radiators in the Type-X are very nice tweets.

phenryiv1
12-06-2006, 08:18 AM
Swap out one side and use your fader to see which sounds better. Of course, you won't be able to evaluate the "fullness" of the complete set, but with all other things being equal, you should be able to put your head near the middle of the car and have one side sound better. If you can't tell the difference, pick one set and run with it.

ewoevo
12-06-2006, 08:49 AM
That's not a bad idea. I may try that this weekend. Thanks for the inputs guys. I'll let you know what I find out.

helotaxi
12-06-2006, 01:38 PM
Swap out one side and use your fader to see which sounds better. Of course, you won't be able to evaluate the "fullness" of the complete set, but with all other things being equal, you should be able to put your head near the middle of the car and have one side sound better. If you can't tell the difference, pick one set and run with it.

That really won't give you any indication of what each will sound like. You will be listening to one off axis (driver's side) and one much more on axis (passenger side). As such they will sound totally different. You can prove what I'm talking about by playing with your fader with what you currently have installed.

phenryiv1
12-06-2006, 02:12 PM
That really won't give you any indication of what each will sound like. You will be listening to one off axis (driver's side) and one much more on axis (passenger side). As such they will sound totally different. You can prove what I'm talking about by playing with your fader with what you currently have installed.


I hear what you are saying, and I somewhat hinted at that in my post. I also proposed a ghetto-remedy. :D


[Y]ou won't be able to evaluate the "fullness" of the complete set, but with all other things being equal, you should be able to put your head near the middle of the car and have one side sound better.

But I see your point.

Notwerk
12-06-2006, 02:59 PM
Only if it's a mono signal. Most recording tend to place different tracks on the right or left channel, meaning the majority of the drums, for example, might be on the right side with most of the vocals on the left. Of course, that depends on the recording, but most engineers will arrange things that way. Doing a left-right comparison is likely comparing apples to oranges. I guess it might help a bit, but I'd be weary of making a judgment off that approach alone.

phenryiv1
12-06-2006, 03:19 PM
Only if it's a mono signal. Most recording tend to place different tracks on the right or left channel, meaning the majority of the drums, for example, might be on the right side with most of the vocals on the left. Of course, that depends on the recording, but most engineers will arrange things that way. Doing a left-right comparison is likely comparing apples to oranges. I guess it might help a bit, but I'd be weary of making a judgment off that approach alone.
^^^^^^^^^
I did not consider that. I sit corrected.

Torgus
12-06-2006, 04:39 PM
That really won't give you any indication of what each will sound like. You will be listening to one off axis (driver's side) and one much more on axis (passenger side). As such they will sound totally different. You can prove what I'm talking about by playing with your fader with what you currently have installed.

off axis. what are you talking about??? off of what axis? are you trying to say something about time alignment? which is the biggest joke in car stereos EVER?

the only reason it would sound weird is because it's ment to be stereo and your only sending it one side of the music.

all you do is set your amp up to take a mono signal instead of stereo. that is if you want to compare them this way. which is a bad way imo but ya.

DejaWiz
12-06-2006, 04:49 PM
off axis. what are you talking about??? off of what axis?

Off axis means that your ear is not in line (perfectly perpendicular) to the firing direction of the speaker cone. Depending on the speaker, this can make a huge difference in the way the sound is perceived and processed by your brain.

WhoSayWho?
12-06-2006, 05:17 PM
off axis. what are you talking about??? off of what axis? are you trying to say something about time alignment? which is the biggest joke in car stereos EVER?

the only reason it would sound weird is because it's ment to be stereo and your only sending it one side of the music.

all you do is set your amp up to take a mono signal instead of stereo. that is if you want to compare them this way. which is a bad way imo but ya.

You seem kind of mad about all this.

Calikid
12-06-2006, 05:21 PM
just put a pair of alpine on the right side and the jl set on the other.

Torgus
12-06-2006, 06:03 PM
how is running only one side make it off axis??? either they are positioned correctly or not...

Notwerk
12-07-2006, 12:31 AM
off axis. what are you talking about??? off of what axis? are you trying to say something about time alignment? which is the biggest joke in car stereos EVER?

the only reason it would sound weird is because it's ment to be stereo and your only sending it one side of the music.

all you do is set your amp up to take a mono signal instead of stereo. that is if you want to compare them this way. which is a bad way imo but ya.

No, you're completely wrong about this. He's right. If you're sitting on the driver's side, as is expected, and you have a JL on the driver's side (off axis because it's far closer to you and pointing in a different direction relative to your body) and an Alpine on the other side (on axis relative to your position in the driver's side), you're comparing apples to oranges.

Time alignment wouldn't compensate for this at all, though there's nothing inherently wrong with time alignment other than the fact that while it may make one side of the car sound better, it usually comes at the expense of the other side of the car. In competitions were ratings are given from two positions in the car (driver and passenger), it's not very useful. In competitions where scores are tallied from one side, say the driver's side, it can help. But it still won't correct for the axis of the speaker. Only the time at which the sound arrives at your ears (path length).

I don't know why you would think he's talking about time alignment. That's completely different and he never mentioned it. He's talking strictly about the effect the speaker position, relative to where you're seated in the car, would have on the sound of the speaker.