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LeofromtheH
11-22-2006, 11:28 PM
so i'm sure plenty of people've got this alarm on their ride. well i just got mine installed today and was looking at the job they did, as this was the first time i took my truck to get worked on at a shop instead of doing itmyself.
first off, they didn't quite 'hide' wires much, nor did they hide the brain very well, and the wire leading to the starter sort of 'rests' along top the engine, which was wrapped in electrical tape, as was everyother wire they installed underneath the steering column. even from the drive home i could tell the tape was already becoming loose. so i'm thinking of getting some sort of heat shield/surround to help disguise it a bit better as well. also, the shock sensor was mounted underneath the steering column, and is only activated from me tapping on the bottom part of the dash. i tried rocking the truck back and forth, everything from the outise, but it was no go.

so my main questions are,

where are your shock sensors located/where would they be most effective?
and what would be something good to wrap around wires that are in the engine bay to protect from heat, and help disguise it abit; along with the wires inside the cab?

negativezeroz
11-22-2006, 11:28 PM
Wire loom

http://www.cardomain.com/shoplist~t~Wiring+Loom+Tubing

azimuth
11-22-2006, 11:30 PM
my shock sensors are in the tail light and head light.

LeofromtheH
11-22-2006, 11:31 PM
cool, any suggestions on the shock sensor? is there something that needs to be activated that i don't know of?

edit: hmmm, i think i have an extra one from my last alarm. does it get it to go off for minor things like someone bumping into it? that's kinda what i want, atleast the warning chirp

Randy Savage
11-22-2006, 11:36 PM
Shock sensor works best tied to a large group of wires, such as the ignition harness, from my experience. I was taught never to attach it to metal or the frame of the vehicle.

If this were me, I'd either bring it back and ask them to do a better job with the wiring and taping of the wires, or clean it up yourself if you don't trust them to do the job correctly. I know when I do a Rem Start/Alarm, all of the wires are taped at least 2 times over, and zip-tied every ~6".

As for the wire in the engine compartment, it should be loomed, and ran alongside other loom/wiring in the engine and zip tied to that.

RFCV
11-23-2006, 12:05 AM
I tried rocking the truck back and forth, everything from the outside, but it was no go.


Shock sensors are not triggered from 'rocking back & forth', but rather hitting the vehicle. The DEI 504D Stinger DoubleGuard Dual Zone Shock should be installed with that system. It is a warn-away with a light hit & full alarm trigger on harder hits.


BTW, motion sensors are for 'rocking back & forth'.

LeofromtheH
11-23-2006, 07:32 PM
Shock sensor works best tied to a large group of wires, such as the ignition harness, from my experience. I was taught never to attach it to metal or the frame of the vehicle.

If this were me, I'd either bring it back and ask them to do a better job with the wiring and taping of the wires, or clean it up yourself if you don't trust them to do the job correctly. I know when I do a Rem Start/Alarm, all of the wires are taped at least 2 times over, and zip-tied every ~6".

As for the wire in the engine compartment, it should be loomed, and ran alongside other loom/wiring in the engine and zip tied to that.

i'll be taking it back to see what they can do tomorrow if they're open. the installation included 'warranty', on the installation that is, so if i had any concerns i could come back and ask.


Shock sensors are not triggered from 'rocking back & forth', but rather hitting the vehicle. The DEI 504D Stinger DoubleGuard Dual Zone Shock should be installed with that system. It is a warn-away with a light hit & full alarm trigger on harder hits.


BTW, motion sensors are for 'rocking back & forth'.

oh i see, so the motion sensor is an add-on to the alrm? i was noticing there's quite afew add-ons that can be had for this alarm, i'm guessing this being one of them. i'll try 'knocking' instead of 'rocking' and see if it's triggered. i was just curious cause a buddy of mine has thesame alarm and his is very sensitive, which is how i would like mine to be. i don't know if he's got more sensors or what sothat may be it too.

RFCV
11-23-2006, 10:28 PM
Oh I see, so the motion sensor is an add-on to the alarm? I was noticing there's quite a few add-ons that can be had for this alarm. I'm guessing this being one of them.





I am not absolutely sure what all sensors come with that alarm, but I am sure of a shock, specifically the DEI 504D.
I am really surprised they let you leave without explaining in detail about the alarm, it's functions & how to correctly use it. :eyebrow:






I'll try 'knocking' instead of 'rocking' and see if it's triggered.





It should respond either with warning chirps for a lighter hit or full alarm trigger with harder hits.







I was just curious cause a buddy of mine has the same alarm and his is very sensitive, which is how I would like mine to be. I don't know if he's got more sensors or what so that may be it too.



* Very Important to remember is correct sensor sensitivity.
Too low (counterclockwise) & the sensor might not detect a true break-in, (although usually it takes much more force than testing for a actual break-in) OR too high (clockwise) & the sensor will cause more false alarms (which is a nuisance, especially if you have multiple sirens!)

I recommend about half to 3/4 towards max for proper alarm sensor sensitivity. Not high enough for false alarms & not low enough to not alarm when needed & if needed, God forbid!

krouchchocolate
11-23-2006, 10:37 PM
Wat's the difference between the regular shock sensor vs the DEI 504D shock sensor?

RFCV
11-23-2006, 10:49 PM
What's the difference between the regular shock sensor vs the DEI 504D shock sensor?


The DEI 504D is a dual zone shock sensor. That means it has warn-away with light hit (a thief testing the alarm before he tries anything further) & full alarm trigger with hard hit (a actual theft attempt).

There are other dual zone shocks and single zone (only full alarm trigger without warn-away first).

LeofromtheH
11-24-2006, 12:31 AM
* Very Important to remember is correct sensor sensitivity.
Too low (counterclockwise) & the sensor might not detect a true break-in, (although usually it takes much more force than testing for a actual break-in) OR too high (clockwise) & the sensor will cause more false alarms (which is a nuisance, especially if you have multiple sirens!)

I recommend about half to 3/4 towards max for proper alarm sensor sensitivity. Not high enough for false alarms & not low enough to not alarm when needed & if needed, God forbid!

gotchya, like i had said, i'll take it back to get abit more educated about it. i think they thought they didn't need to tell me how to use it cause i got the alarm from a friend and not from them, so they assumed i knew how it worked. i don'tknow that mine came with the dual shock or not, but it did come with a shock sensor of some sort. i'll have to ask them about that as well. thanks for all the help. i'll ask if i've gotmore questionaires for ya