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Big Dee
10-25-2006, 03:13 PM
Don't laugh at me.

When buying speakers from madisound or partsexpress for a DIY component set do the speakers come as a pair or are they sold seperately?

bonesninja
10-25-2006, 03:16 PM
seperately unless otherwise noted

Flipx99
10-25-2006, 03:17 PM
gets expensive quick, eh?

Big Dee
10-25-2006, 03:23 PM
That's what I figured.

Yeah it's hard to stay within a certain budget because there's always something just a little more expensive, but better, then something just a tad more expensive than that one, etc. until you are way over budget.

Flipx99
10-25-2006, 03:26 PM
That's what I figured.

Yeah it's hard to stay within a certain budget because there's always something just a little more expensive, but better, then something just a tad more expensive than that one, etc. until you are way over budget.

What I do in those situations is research what others chose that works well with the componets you have already selected.

Big Dee
10-25-2006, 04:34 PM
I want to find some 4 ohm wid woofers to go with some Vifa XT tweets which are also 4 ohms, or can I just use 8 ohm mids without problems?

I'm also gonna make my own crossovers since I can't find pre made ones that fit my needs.

kicker06
10-25-2006, 06:09 PM
I don't think that works in a crossover together, but If it does, your going to need a pretty good amp to power them at 8ohms.

4ohms is better, less resistence.

I would think you would want to match the mid woofers and tweeters impendence though.

Big Dee
10-25-2006, 11:11 PM
I think I might go with some Ascendant Audio 6.5" polys, they are pretty cheap and I like their FR, plus 4 ohms.

djman37
10-25-2006, 11:14 PM
I think I might go with some Ascendant Audio 6.5" polys, they are pretty cheap and I like their FR, plus 4 ohms.

they sell the Arbiter TM-1... it's the XT tweet(for car use) and the poly mids. They even sell the XO hardware parts if you really wanna DIY. Mine are sitting in my office waiting to go in.:D

squeak9798
10-26-2006, 11:24 AM
I don't think that works in a crossover together,

It works fine


4ohms is better, less resistence.

That's a completely, utterly, and totally false statement in every sense.


I would think you would want to match the mid woofers and tweeters impendence though.

Impedance doesn't matter (except to the design of the xover).

ramos
10-26-2006, 11:36 AM
Have you thought about going active ? :)

Notwerk
10-26-2006, 02:21 PM
Yeah, on the power thing, here's the deal: When you go 8 ohm, rather than 4 ohm, the added resistance will cut the supply of power from your amp by half, ie an amp that makes 100w at 4 ohm will make 50w at 8 ohm. Big difference? Not really. Cutting your power in half really only reduces the real-world output by 3db, which is barely noticeable. So, no, 8 ohm is not necessarily a bad thing and if it means you can get a better speaker, it's definitely worth it.

That being said, PE offers a 4ohm version of their Dayton Reference driver that many people swear by. Of course, the metal cone means you'll have to deal with some resonance (via crossover adjustment), but they draw high praise and are fairly cheap. If you're going active and use a tweeter that can play low, they might be a very good choice.

Flipx99
10-26-2006, 02:25 PM
Yeah, on the power thing, here's the deal: When you go 8 ohm, rather than 4 ohm, the added resistance will cut the supply of power from your amp by half, ie an amp that makes 100w at 4 ohm will make 50w at 8 ohm. Big difference? Not really. Cutting your power in half really only reduces the real-world output by 3db, which is barely noticeable. So, no, 8 ohm is not necessarily a bad thing and if it means you can get a better speaker, it's definitely worth it.

That being said, PE offers a 4ohm version of their Dayton Reference driver that many people swear by. Of course, the metal cone means you'll have to deal with some resonance (via crossover adjustment), but they draw high praise and are fairly cheap. If you're going active and use a tweeter that can play low, they might be a very good choice.

Not to mention the sensitivities of 4-ohm vs 8-ohm speakers are usually rated differently that more than make up this difference.

ramos
10-26-2006, 03:45 PM
Yeah, on the power thing, here's the deal: When you go 8 ohm, rather than 4 ohm, the added resistance will cut the supply of power from your amp by half, ie an amp that makes 100w at 4 ohm will make 50w at 8 ohm. Big difference? Not really. Cutting your power in half really only reduces the real-world output by 3db, which is barely noticeable. So, no, 8 ohm is not necessarily a bad thing and if it means you can get a better speaker, it's definitely worth it.

That being said, PE offers a 4ohm version of their Dayton Reference driver that many people swear by. Of course, the metal cone means you'll have to deal with some resonance (via crossover adjustment), but they draw high praise and are fairly cheap. If you're going active and use a tweeter that can play low, they might be a very good choice.


I think the selling point for the 4ohm vs. 8ohm dayton refs in the car audio world. Has a lot to do with the reduced mounting depth of the 4ohm ,due to not having the bucking magnet on it :)

squeak9798
10-26-2006, 09:43 PM
Not to mention the sensitivities of 4-ohm vs 8-ohm speakers are usually rated differently that more than make up this difference.

They shouldn't be. Both should be rated at 1w/1m.

The problem is that many manufacturers [incorrectly] rate their 4ohm drivers at 2.83V...which for a 4ohm driver is 2w rather than 1w.

Though you are correct in that the sensitivities must be taken into account aswell.

Plus, most tweeters are typically attenuated anyways (or attention is included in the passive design, such as an L-pad) due to our ear's higher sensitivity to those frequencies, so any potential differences in volume can easily be [and should be] compensated for.