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View Full Version : which router?



PatFitz9
09-17-2006, 01:00 PM
so which router would you pick? i only want to spend ~$100 so i narrowed it down to these 3.

craftsman 1 (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?cat=Portable+Power+Tools&pid=00917517000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Routers+%26+Laminate+Trimmers&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes)

craftsman 2 (http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?cat=Portable+Power+Tools&pid=00917533000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Routers+%26+Laminate+Trimmers&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes)

Ryobi RE180PL (i can't figure out direct links for home depot)
http://www.homedepot.com/cmc_upload/HDUS/EN_US/asset/images/eplus/165667_4.jpg

so any advantages/disadvantages to them? i think the craftsman comes with a lifetime warranty so thats a plus. do they all work with a Jasper Jig? i am leaning towards the 1st craftsman with the digital readout.

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 01:28 PM
Well, the craftsman links arent working for me for some reason. But, I have the Ryobi router, and I really like it, especially for the price. I have good luck with it, and it seems to be a very good router. Have had it for almost a year now, and it still works great. I use it quite a bit too.

iamamp3pimp
09-17-2006, 02:57 PM
i have a black and decker firestorm and its been great fr me.

OCURIEL
09-17-2006, 03:34 PM
I have a $30 router. I purchased it from e-bay. Works great if your only going to use it to make rings or little projects. It's brand new. I'm sure there might be more on sale.

iamamp3pimp
09-17-2006, 04:18 PM
^^^

is that a harbor freight one?

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 04:59 PM
I just took back one of my harbor freight ones today, cause it already broke. Complete POS, good thing i only paid $25 with a 1 year warrantly.

KRD
09-17-2006, 07:40 PM
I have a Ryobi and it works great. I use a Black and Decker from ace hardware for the jasper jigs. It cost 66 plus tax and works fine.

thatkidbob
09-17-2006, 09:23 PM
Ryobi routers are good if you don't plan on spinning HUGE bits and doing furniture with 'em... for stuff like building boxes they're more than good enough...

i've got a lil Ryobi RE175...1/4 inch collet ( :( ) but it does the trick.

helotaxi
09-17-2006, 09:35 PM
A good thing to look for is a replaceable collet. My Skil has the collet integral to the motor spindle. The collet is wearing out and as such the router is going in the trash soon because the collet can't be replaced. My Craftsman Professional came with both a 1/4" and 1/2" collet making it more versatile.

bamaboy
09-17-2006, 09:40 PM
i need a jasper jig, i **** at circle cutting

anyone have a used one :(

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 09:42 PM
I have one that I broke. Could probably fix it with some epoxy. Hit me up if your interested.

PatFitz9
09-17-2006, 10:03 PM
A good thing to look for is a replaceable collet. My Skil has the collet integral to the motor spindle. The collet is wearing out and as such the router is going in the trash soon because the collet can't be replaced. My Craftsman Professional came with both a 1/4" and 1/2" collet making it more versatile.

yeah, the first craftsman has 1/4 and 1/2 collets. i think that i am going to go with the craftsman, even though the ryobi is $40 less.

bamaboy
09-17-2006, 10:11 PM
I have a Ryobi and it works great. I use a Black and Decker from ace hardware for the jasper jigs. It cost 66 plus tax and works fine.

will the ryobi not work with it?

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 10:12 PM
Yes the ryobi works with it.

ultimate157
09-17-2006, 10:24 PM
I was looking to get something like this:

http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku=2013&filter=%22Lewin%20Router%20Compass%22

I just wish it did smaller than 8" for smaller projects.

Whats the smallest circle the jasper jig can cut with a router attached?

PatFitz9
09-17-2006, 10:53 PM
I was looking to get something like this:

http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku=2013&filter=%22Lewin%20Router%20Compass%22

I just wish it did smaller than 8" for smaller projects.

Whats the smallest circle the jasper jig can cut with a router attached?

http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&DID=7&Partnumber=365-250

2 1/4" circle. also, they say it works with all sears routers, is that the same as craftsman?

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 11:08 PM
Yea, I would assume it would work with the craftsman.

James Bang
09-17-2006, 11:08 PM
you can always make your own jasper with 1/4" hard board.

mazdakid
09-17-2006, 11:19 PM
ill sell you my skil with the set of bits, and the $28 roundover bit i bought for it. i bought it and used it once

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 11:32 PM
you can always make your own jasper with 1/4" hard board.

I used to use one I made. It doesnt even compare to the Jasper. It is probably the best tool I have bought for building boxes.

helotaxi
09-18-2006, 11:23 AM
I was looking to get something like this:

http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?sku=2013&filter=%22Lewin%20Router%20Compass%22

I just wish it did smaller than 8" for smaller projects.

Whats the smallest circle the jasper jig can cut with a router attached?

I'd be worrying about that thing slipping halfway through a cut. If I needed a really big circle I'd make a one-off from a piece of hardboard for that particular project. If I want something for repeatable results for the normal sized circle I normally need to cut the Jasper is perfect. I have the smallest one (model 400) and the medium one (model 200). Between them they cover everything from 1" to 18 3/8" in 1/16" increments. They can't slip. You get the exact right size circle every time. With the right bit I've managed to cut rings with 1/8" thickness in 3/4" plywood and MDF. If you only ocassionally build a box a jig saw and a steady hand will do. If you build a lot of boxes or do a decent amount of other custom work it's almost a necessary tool.

ramos
09-18-2006, 11:31 AM
A good thing to look for is a replaceable collet. My Skil has the collet integral to the motor spindle. The collet is wearing out and as such the router is going in the trash soon because the collet can't be replaced. My Craftsman Professional came with both a 1/4" and 1/2" collet making it more versatile.


Is your skil newer ? reason I ask is, I have an old skil router . Had it for years , and it has the 1/4" and 1/2" collets that are interchangeable . Just wondering if this is something they did away with . Couldn't fathom why they would :)

Flipx99
09-18-2006, 11:34 AM
This is what I use.

http://www.amazon.com/Makita-RF1101KIT2-H-P-Industrial-Router/dp/B0002HC4IM/sr=8-1/qid=1158594020/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-1056549-5772137?ie=UTF8&s=hi


Plus the jasper jig.

What router table (if any) does anyone use?

Flipx99
09-18-2006, 11:38 AM
If I want something for repeatable results for the normal sized circle I normally need to cut the Jasper is perfect. I have the smallest one (model 400) and the medium one (model 200). Between them they cover everything from 1" to 18 3/8" in 1/16" increments. They can't slip. You get the exact right size circle every time. With the right bit I've managed to cut rings with 1/8" thickness in 3/4" plywood and MDF. If you only ocassionally build a box a jig saw and a steady hand will do. If you build a lot of boxes or do a decent amount of other custom work it's almost a necessary tool.

The only problem I have had with the jasper is that the hole you insert the nail in gets worn and elongates, messing up your circle.

Also, how do you do the rings? Do the outside, then cutout the inside? What do you use to holddown the middle? Pics would be excellent.

ramos
09-18-2006, 12:45 PM
I have had my current jasper for two years . Previous one for I don't remember how long . Never had a problem with the holes wearing. If anything they have always been to tight . For rings I cut from the outside in. :)

nVRuckus
09-18-2006, 12:57 PM
my ryobi has worked perfectly without flaw and I use a jasper 200 too..

Flipx99
09-18-2006, 12:59 PM
I have had my current jasper for two years . Previous one for I don't remember how long . Never had a problem with the holes wearing. If anything they have always been to tight . For rings I cut from the outside in. :)

I was talking about holes wearing on the mdf. Birch didn't have a problem with it.

Do you have any pics or diagrams to show how making rings work.

Cutting the outside is easy enough, but what about the inside. How do you hold it down?

helotaxi
09-18-2006, 01:01 PM
The only problem I have had with the jasper is that the hole you insert the nail in gets worn and elongates, messing up your circle.Make sure that the hole is drilled perpendicular to the wood and it will minimize the problem. Don't use anything other than the smooth ground pivot pin that came with the jig either. It won't mess up the holes in the jig. Also just let the tool do the work and don't put much if any pressure on it.


Also, how do you do the rings? Do the outside, then cutout the inside? What do you use to holddown the middle? Pics would be excellent.The setup is everything. Use a sacrificial board behind the work and set the cut depth to about 1/8-1/16" into the backing board. Drill the center hole into the backer board so the center point can't slip laterally. I hold the whole thing together with two sided tape. It keeps the rings from spinning once you've cut all the way through and keeps the ring from being pulled into the bit once it's free. Cut the outside first and then the inside.

The most important thing in my opinion is using the correct bit. A straight cut bit isn't it. It places all the cutting load horizontally causing a lot of stress and deflection of the bit. It also leaves the sawdust in the slot that it cuts causing more binding and greater tool loads. Trying to cut thin walls with a straight cut bit can be really frustrating because the side load on the bit will break the ring. I use a spiral up-cut bit. It loads vertically, pulling the router into the work. It also clears the dust out of the cut and keeps it from loading up. The only caution with this type bit is that you have to make sure that the collet is really tight. If it isn't the bit will pull loose from the tool and into the work. Eventually it will cut all the way through everything an into your work surface. The wings on my saw table have a few scars from this happening with the worn collet on the Skil router that I mentioned above.

Ramos-I've had this particular Skil unit for about 3 years. The collet is part of the motor spindle and is total garbage, IMO. If I'd known about it when I bought it, I wouldn't have.

Flipx99
09-18-2006, 01:07 PM
Make sure that the hole is drilled perpendicular to the wood and it will minimize the problem. Don't use anything other than the smooth ground pivot pin that came with the jig either. It won't mess up the holes in the jig. Also just let the tool do the work and don't put much if any pressure on it.

The setup is everything. Use a sacrificial board behind the work and set the cut depth to about 1/8-1/16" into the backing board. Drill the center hole into the backer board so the center point can't slip laterally. I hold the whole thing together with two sided tape. It keeps the rings from spinning once you've cut all the way through and keeps the ring from being pulled into the bit once it's free. Cut the outside first and then the inside.

The most important thing in my opinion is using the correct bit. A straight cut bit isn't it. It places all the cutting load horizontally causing a lot of stress and deflection of the bit. It also leaves the sawdust in the slot that it cuts causing more binding and greater tool loads. Trying to cut thin walls with a straight cut bit can be really frustrating because the side load on the bit will break the ring. I use a spiral up-cut bit. It loads vertically, pulling the router into the work. It also clears the dust out of the cut and keeps it from loading up. The only caution with this type bit is that you have to make sure that the collet is really tight. If it isn't the bit will pull loose from the tool and into the work. Eventually it will cut all the way through everything an into your work surface. The wings on my saw table have a few scars from this happening with the worn collet on the Skil router that I mentioned above.

Ramos-I've had this particular Skil unit for about 3 years. The collet is part of the motor spindle and is total garbage, IMO. If I'd known about it when I bought it, I wouldn't have.

Thanks.

I have been using the nail as the wearing is in the mdf, not the jig itself. I never tried your method. What I was doing was flipping the router on its back and spinning the wood.

I am also going to grab one of the upspiral bits as I understand what you are talking about with the trail of sawdust. Also I bet that straightcut bit is causing the horizontal stress and therefore wearing the mdf around the bit. Makes good sense now.

reneeb7363
09-18-2006, 01:35 PM
I just took back one of my harbor freight ones today, cause it already broke. Complete POS, good thing i only paid $25 with a 1 year warrantly.

ummmmmm....you spent $25.... and you expected what? :eyebrow:

here is a REAL router :p:

5913

nVRuckus
09-18-2006, 02:32 PM
http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&DID=7&Partnumber=365-250

2 1/4" circle. also, they say it works with all sears routers, is that the same as craftsman?

I can do it with my ryobi but the router is bit up to do it ;)