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KRD
09-15-2006, 11:12 PM
I was wondering what type of glue you guys use. I personnally use Tite bond 2. My girlfriends dad keeps telling my that I should use gorilla, because they will be stronger. I have had know problem with the titebond 2, so I was wondering what everyones favorite glue for building boxes.

bjfish11
09-15-2006, 11:13 PM
Dont use gorilla, stick with the titebond.

ssj2xxgotenxx
09-15-2006, 11:22 PM
:search:

davidfre21
09-15-2006, 11:25 PM
tite bond for myself also

gorilla is nasty stuff

bjfish11
09-15-2006, 11:26 PM
tite bond for myself also

gorilla is nasty stuff

Plus too **** expensive.

IonSQL
09-15-2006, 11:34 PM
Titebond II for me....

PV Audio
09-15-2006, 11:36 PM
With all due respect, this is quite possibly the most commonly debated topic in the box forum. Use the search tool.

nVRuckus
09-15-2006, 11:38 PM
I have had know problem with the titebond 2
LMFAO

ultimate157
09-15-2006, 11:57 PM
Titebond II.

I know when to use no and when to not use know. :)

PowerNaudio
09-16-2006, 12:01 AM
i use both gorilla glue seem like a stronger bond. then titebond II. but like stated above is a debate. they both work great. they sell gorilla glue in a very small container so you can give it a try and see how you like it.

ultimate157
09-16-2006, 12:13 AM
After building 2 boxes, a 1 cube and a 4.4 cube, i still have 3/4 of a bottle of titebond left. plus it was like 1/2 the price of guerilla glue for twice the amount :veryhapp:

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 12:59 PM
i use both gorilla glue seem like a stronger bond. then titebond II. but like stated above is a debate. they both work great. they sell gorilla glue in a very small container so you can give it a try and see how you like it.

No, again, it isn't a debate. It's science. Wood glue bonds the two pieces of wood CHEMICALLY, which makes it so that the wood itself will actually split before the glue joint does. In other words, when properly used, a wood joint will outlast the box itself.

Gorilla and other polyurethane glues just bond it strongly, but don't actually guarantee any real strength.

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 01:00 PM
After building 2 boxes, a 1 cube and a 4.4 cube, i still have 3/4 of a bottle of titebond left. plus it was like 1/2 the price of guerilla glue for twice the amount :veryhapp:
:laugh: Does this glue come down from the mountains with AK47s and RPGs on its shoulder?

nVRuckus
09-16-2006, 01:03 PM
its from el salvador

Rattlebrain
09-16-2006, 01:03 PM
No, again, it isn't a debate. It's science. Wood glue bonds the two pieces of wood CHEMICALLY, which makes it so that the wood itself will actually split before the glue joint does. In other words, when properly used, a wood joint will outlast the box itself.

Gorilla and other polyurethane glues just bond it strongly, but don't actually guarantee any real strength.

X2
Wood glue impregnates the fibers of the wood.
Gorilla glue just bonds to the surface.

I use Tight bond II or Elmer's wood glue.

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 01:03 PM
its from el salvador
Ah, makes sense now.

lilmaniac2
09-16-2006, 01:12 PM
the loctite wood glue from walmart is MUCH stronger than the titebond II and its also alot thicker and doesnt run nearly as much

i glued 2 pieces of mdf together with titebond and with loctite .. clamped them togeher then did a stress test between the 2... lets just say the wood broke before the loctite let go :)

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 01:16 PM
the loctite wood glue from walmart is MUCH stronger than the titebond II and its also alot thicker and doesnt run nearly as much

i glued 2 pieces of mdf together with titebond and with loctite .. clamped them togeher then did a stress test between the 2... lets just say the wood broke before the loctite let go :)
I like Elmer's Probond more than Titebond II, but only Home Depot has it, and I will only go there is Lowes is out of MDF.

Rattlebrain
09-16-2006, 01:27 PM
the loctite wood glue from walmart is MUCH stronger than the titebond II and its also alot thicker and doesnt run nearly as much

i glued 2 pieces of mdf together with titebond and with loctite .. clamped them togeher then did a stress test between the 2... lets just say the wood broke before the loctite let go :)

Good tip. May have to try it.

djman37
09-16-2006, 01:35 PM
x23452345 on titebond(i like II) or good ol' Elmer's wood glue.
Where's all the liquid nail foos? Not up yet?!?!?:D

Gorilla glue definitely has it's place in woodworking. More of a grained wood repair glue though. It is made to epxand and help repair things like table/chair legs and such. VERY strong in that application.

I wonder if the O.P. source of woodworking information thought it'd be a good idea to put screws in every 4 inches or so too!:D

pwuthedon
09-16-2006, 01:36 PM
gorilla glue sux

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 01:43 PM
I like gorilla glue. I like how it expands. My boxes don't leak :)

Neither does silicone ;)

PowerNaudio
09-16-2006, 01:53 PM
from carpenters at woodworking.com
read from the pros. (http://www.woodworking.com/ww101glue.cfm)
they talk about all sort of wood glues.

but here is a quote that made the most sence.


"from - MadMark: Your old standby "carpenters yellow" will form a bond stronger than the wood. Once you're beyond the wood failure point, does it really matter how far you're beyond it? The reasons for using alternate glues are not normally issues of strength, but of cost, application method, pot life, work time, setup time, water resistance, etc. Most any of the glues, properly applied will be stronger than the wood itself."forum link (http://www.woodworking.com/dcforum/dcboard.pl)

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 02:00 PM
from carpenters at woodworking.com
read from the pros. (http://www.woodworking.com/ww101glue.cfm)
they talk about all sort of wood glues.

but here is a quote that made the most sence.


"from - MadMark: Your old standby "carpenters yellow" will form a bond stronger than the wood. Once you're beyond the wood failure point, does it really matter how far you're beyond it? The reasons for using alternate glues are not normally issues of strength, but of cost, application method, pot life, work time, setup time, water resistance, etc. Most any of the glues, properly applied will be stronger than the wood itself."forum link (http://www.woodworking.com/dcforum/dcboard.pl)

Okay, and...

PowerNaudio
09-16-2006, 03:37 PM
I was wondering what type of glue you guys use. I personnally use Tite bond 2. My girlfriends dad keeps telling my that I should use gorilla, because they will be stronger. I have had know problem with the titebond 2, so I was wondering what everyones favorite glue for building boxes.


i use both gorilla glue seem like a stronger bond. then titebond II. but like stated above is a debate. they both work great. they sell gorilla glue in a very small container so you can give it a try and see how you like it.


No, again, it isn't a debate. It's science. Wood glue bonds the two pieces of wood CHEMICALLY, which makes it so that the wood itself will actually split before the glue joint does. In other words, when properly used, a wood joint will outlast the box itself.

Gorilla and other polyurethane glues just bond it strongly, but don't actually guarantee any real strength.


from carpenters at woodworking.com
read from the pros. (http://www.woodworking.com/ww101glue.cfm)
they talk about all sort of wood glues.

but here is a quote that made the most sence.


"from - MadMark: Your old standby "carpenters yellow" will form a bond stronger than the wood. Once you're beyond the wood failure point, does it really matter how far you're beyond it? The reasons for using alternate glues are not normally issues of strength, but of cost, application method, pot life, work time, setup time, water resistance, etc. Most any of the glues, properly applied will be stronger than the wood itself."forum link (http://www.woodworking.com/dcforum/dcboard.pl)


Okay, and...

let me put it real easy for you.

preaty much any repectable brand of glue that advertises it self as being able bond two pieses of wood together will be strong enogh for building an enclosure.

now the reason i state that i like gorilla glue is because it has expanding properties wich forces it self for better area cover with less use of glue. the gorilla glue it self is stronger then titebond II, thats why you can use it for more then just bonding wood. is my preference. i dont use it on every enclosure i build because of cost titebond II cost less then gorilla glue.

thats all.
anything else you whant to know?

bjfish11
09-16-2006, 03:37 PM
from carpenters at woodworking.com
read from the pros. (http://www.woodworking.com/ww101glue.cfm)
they talk about all sort of wood glues.

but here is a quote that made the most sence.


"from - MadMark: Your old standby "carpenters yellow" will form a bond stronger than the wood. Once you're beyond the wood failure point, does it really matter how far you're beyond it? The reasons for using alternate glues are not normally issues of strength, but of cost, application method, pot life, work time, setup time, water resistance, etc. Most any of the glues, properly applied will be stronger than the wood itself."forum link (http://www.woodworking.com/dcforum/dcboard.pl)
Well, if cost is the case, you definatly need to stay away from gorilla glue.

mazdakid
09-16-2006, 03:49 PM
$6 for a small bottle of gg around here

bjfish11
09-16-2006, 06:41 PM
$6 for a small bottle of gg around here

It its the small bottle im thinking of, it would take me at least 2 bottles of that stuff to do a box.

PV Audio
09-16-2006, 08:12 PM
let me put it real easy for you.

preaty much any repectable brand of glue that advertises it self as being able bond two pieses of wood together will be strong enogh for building an enclosure.

now the reason i state that i like gorilla glue is because it has expanding properties wich forces it self for better area cover with less use of glue. the gorilla glue it self is stronger then titebond II, thats why you can use it for more then just bonding wood. is my preference. i dont use it on every enclosure i build because of cost titebond II cost less then gorilla glue.

thats all.
anything else you whant to know?
It's fact bud. Wood glue bonds stronger than gorilla glue.

Immacomputer
09-16-2006, 08:18 PM
Gorilla glue did not hold as strong as some liquid nail wood glue I just recently tested with. It was also more frustrating to use and I had an accident with it that cost me a shop towel. So far, I have enjoyed elmer's wood glue the best but I have never used titebond but plan on using it for my next build.

PowerNaudio
09-16-2006, 10:33 PM
Gorilla glue did not hold as strong as some liquid nail wood glue I just recently tested with. It was also more frustrating to use and I had an accident with it that cost me a shop towel. So far, I have enjoyed elmer's wood glue the best but I have never used titebond but plan on using it for my next build.

one thing you have to do with gorilla glue wich is a pain in the ***, is that the area that youre going to lay the glue on has to be damped. you know just grab a semi wet rag and run it along the edge of both pieses of wood and then put your line of gorilla glue. thats how it activates it self on the area is going to hold in place.

Immacomputer
09-16-2006, 11:33 PM
I know how to use the glue; my last enclosure was made with it. Have you tried glueing something without dampening? It holds about as well as spit.

Fast1one
09-16-2006, 11:55 PM
I didnt like gorilla glue...in my experience elmers dries a lot quicker so I can finish a box extremely quick...

heyman421
09-17-2006, 12:12 AM
one thing you have to do with gorilla glue wich is a pain in the ***, is that the area that youre going to lay the glue on has to be damped. you know just grab a semi wet rag and run it along the edge of both pieses of wood and then put your line of gorilla glue. thats how it activates it self on the area is going to hold in place.

easier said than done, MDF soaks up a SUPRISING amount of water before it actually shows any signs of 'dampness'

better grab a jug of water, or a garden hose :eek:

or just get yourself some wood glue, a few tubes of silicone, and a 1" brad nailer

in my experience, gorilla glue can get real ugly, real fast.

thatkidbob
09-17-2006, 12:15 AM
^ ditto... if i had a brad nailer i could knock out a box in 30 minutes.

hell, if i had clamps i could do it in 45 haha. (btw... this is the reason why i make cuts oversized put things together with edges hanging off, then knock off the extra with a belt sander. as long as all the corners are 90 degrees, the box looks like it was built from perfect cuts afterwards.)

DaGh0st
09-17-2006, 12:22 AM
I use Titebond 2, it works and its half the price of GG

ballstothewall
09-17-2006, 11:51 AM
I know how to use the glue; my last enclosure was made with it. Have you tried glueing something without dampening? It holds about as well as spit.


Whats dampening, and how does it pertain to gluing?

Rattlebrain
09-17-2006, 11:54 AM
Whats dampening, and how does it pertain to gluing?

When using Gorilla glue, you have to dampen the surface your gluing with water.
It activates the glue.

ballstothewall
09-17-2006, 12:00 PM
Another reason to not use gorilla glue...

PV Audio
09-17-2006, 12:30 PM
Shouldn't be using it anyway ;)

ultimate157
09-17-2006, 12:53 PM
Chem 101: What's stronger, a chemical bond or a physical bond.

PV Audio
09-17-2006, 01:05 PM
That's been covered already :)

ballstothewall
09-17-2006, 01:11 PM
Shouldn't be using it anyway ;)


Never touched it, never will. :)

Immacomputer
09-17-2006, 01:33 PM
Whats dampening, and how does it pertain to gluing?

Using a sponge and wetting the area where you're going to glue. Gorilla glue uses water as a catalyst to expand and so you need to wet or dampen the area. Not dampening as in sound deadening.

Lurius
09-17-2006, 02:24 PM
I use titebond 3. It has a longer curing time than titebond 2 but is supposed to be a little wtronger.. 36" clamps and screws hold it together while it dries, no problems yet.

-Lurius

UndercoverPunk
09-17-2006, 02:42 PM
Woodglue. I hhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhate GG.

The expansion is what makes it so ****** IMO, I don't need my glue to fill gaps, I usually don't have any, and if I do, I can handle my caulk like no one's business. :naughty:

PV Audio
09-17-2006, 08:01 PM
That..you can.

I don't like Titebond III very much. It takes for****ingever to cure, and you won't see any huge differences.

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 08:15 PM
That..you can.

I don't like Titebond III very much. It takes for****ingever to cure, and you won't see any huge differences.

Yea, and dont they say one of the main advantages of III over II is that it is weather proof? If you need your glue to withstand water and weather, then you have more problems on your hand then just the glue.

PV Audio
09-17-2006, 08:29 PM
^^ :laugh: True, monsieur poisson

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 09:57 PM
^^ :laugh: True, monsieur poisson

I dont know what that means......:uhoh:

Immacomputer
09-17-2006, 10:11 PM
If you need your glue to withstand water and weather, then you have more problems on your hand then just the glue.

Sadly, 3 of my previous 4 enclosures have failed due to water damage and now two mids have failed due to water. Water is my bane. I had a 240 that leaked no matter what I did. My laste enlcosure failed because my camelbak leaked about 2 liters of water right at the base of my enclosure. Some how my bike squished open the mouth piece as I was heading out to go riding. :(

bjfish11
09-17-2006, 10:31 PM
Sadly, 3 of my previous 4 enclosures have failed due to water damage and now two mids have failed due to water. Water is my bane. I had a 240 that leaked no matter what I did. My laste enlcosure failed because my camelbak leaked about 2 liters of water right at the base of my enclosure. Some how my bike squished open the mouth piece as I was heading out to go riding. :(

That *****. But the point I was that with MDF, it will fail due to water before your glue ever will.

rollin_cc_s10
09-18-2006, 04:42 AM
I dont know what that means......:uhoh:

"mr. fish" - french