PDA

View Full Version : Maximizing sound quality in door speakers



cool9
08-18-2006, 02:45 AM
Speaker in doors considered ported or sealed? I'd say they're ported because there are so many leaks in the door panel edges. So how should you set up the door system? Try to absorb all the sound inside the door as you can or let some of the sound out?

http://www.hometheaterhifi.com/volume_5_2/cmilleressayporting.html

Even though loudspeakers utilizing bass reflex techniques (i.e., ported or passive radiator designs) are quite common, or maybe even the norm if you carouse the average audio/video retailer. There are, however, many misconceptions about how a bass-reflex system works. Most of these are either incomplete or flat out wrong. Here is a list of typical bits of misinformation:

Porting a speaker increases efficiency by allowing the back-wave generated by the driver to reinforce the front-wave.

Ported speakers have higher distortion than sealed enclosure speakers.

Ported speakers are more dynamic than sealed enclosure speakers.

The output of the port and woofer are out of phase with one another.

Ported speakers arenít accurate as sealed enclosure speakers because ports (and passive radiators) are resonant devices

Worlddre
08-18-2006, 02:49 AM
speakers in doors are considered infinite baffle ...there is a sticky at the top of this forum title proper door sound deadening and you which should answer your question

audiolife
08-18-2006, 11:15 AM
its also dependant on the drivers used some speakers like sealed up enclosures others just like infanate baffle. thats why i always say find out how far you want to take it before you spend $$$$$$ on something that doesnt fit what you want to do

heyman421
08-18-2006, 11:21 AM
those leaks you speak of shouldn't be there either way

you will have no midbass unless the back of the speaker's completely sealed off from the front of the wave

audiolife
08-18-2006, 11:32 AM
those leaks you speak of shouldn't be there either way

you will have no midbass unless the back of the speaker's completely sealed off from the front of the wave

that part isnt hard to do at all i have 5.25" that are ib and they play flat to 20hz its more important to get a speaker to fill ur needs and wants

cool9
08-18-2006, 01:32 PM
Can you use something besides clay to act as a gasket between the speaker/door panel? How about some felt, semi-firm rubber or firm latex-rubber that's easier to work with? I just bought Polk Momo 5.25", too.

heyman421
08-18-2006, 01:36 PM
you don't have to use anything if you don't want

if you're really putting an effort into this, i'd just do it the way someone recommended in the walkthrough

do it the right way and find out what it's supposed to sound like before you try and experiment with different materials

you'll have no frame of reference to know if it sounds ok or not...

cool9
08-18-2006, 01:52 PM
I never worked with clay is why I asked. Don't you have to heat it to harden it and how would you make a piece that's very thin?

I love the way these speaker manufacturers make their speakers: all this high tech work then they throw these big, thick grilles on the front . The Polk Momo grill covers about 50% of the front of the speaker.

GemaRastem
08-18-2006, 01:54 PM
you don't want the pieces very thin, and you don't want it to harden, the point is to use something soft yet sturdy that is malleable to seperate the speaker from your door.

audiolife
08-18-2006, 02:52 PM
but really the number 1 way to maximize your sound is move the speakers out of your door....lol Kick panels

cool9
08-18-2006, 03:36 PM
They want more for kick panels ($150 each) than speakers, I don't have that money.

audiolife
08-18-2006, 03:50 PM
they sell them as each or a pr? never seen anyone run one lol but it was more or less a ribbing on dorr speakers than actually being serious