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View Full Version : Finally got my bike back together!!



mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 03:58 AM
Its been about a month since she went down, looped her on a wheelie. Wish I had before pics because man was it ****ed!

http://img90.imageshack.us/img90/8056/dscf0031bl4.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

SAG3
08-10-2006, 04:05 AM
i bet its fast

SBLAZER
08-10-2006, 04:06 AM
looks good man. keep her on the ground

90accordman
08-10-2006, 04:08 AM
looks **** nice

mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 04:10 AM
Thanx guys!

mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 04:31 AM
looks good man. keep her on the ground

I'll try :ponder:

THUNDERBIRD
08-10-2006, 08:19 AM
thats what i wanna get and get some gold aviators and a ****** leather jacket so i can be maverik

mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 12:34 PM
LOL, go for it!

Wkbdkid
08-10-2006, 04:10 PM
does look good wanna get a street bike in the near future

2loud4u
08-10-2006, 04:12 PM
does look good wanna get a street bike in the near future

X2
Looks sharp.

Might pick one up this fall.
Keep it on 2 wheels and between the ditches.

Savstyle
08-10-2006, 04:17 PM
Ive always wanted a streetbike, but ive never rode one, so buying one and ridin it is jus a bad idea, any advice?

Wkbdkid
08-10-2006, 04:33 PM
thast what friends are for :D

supraman1379
08-10-2006, 04:54 PM
looks good

mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 05:04 PM
Ive always wanted a streetbike, but ive never rode one, so buying one and ridin it is jus a bad idea, any advice?

YES, DONT DO IT. Seriously man, these things are insanely fast. The absolute BEST advice I can give you is buy something like a ninja 250/500, learn how to ride properly on it. Learner bikes have good re-sale value, so sell it an then step up to a street bike.
Problem is, when you first do ANYTHING, you make mistakes, an you learn from them. thats how you get better. But on a newer street bike, 600+ especially 06+ cuz they just keep getting faster, mistakes are not so forgiving :drool: < u dont wanna look like that on the side of the road

Fast1one
08-10-2006, 05:12 PM
I want one as well...someday...sweet bike

BaseSteala112
08-10-2006, 06:20 PM
That GSXR 600 is nice. I'm deciding between that or the R6. Decisions...Desicions. Nice bike.

kngadrok
08-10-2006, 06:32 PM
YES, DONT DO IT. Seriously man, these things are insanely fast. The absolute BEST advice I can give you is buy something like a ninja 250/500, learn how to ride properly on it. Learner bikes have good re-sale value, so sell it an then step up to a street bike.
Problem is, when you first do ANYTHING, you make mistakes, an you learn from them. thats how you get better. But on a newer street bike, 600+ especially 06+ cuz they just keep getting faster, mistakes are not so forgiving

I AGREE. find a 500 and learn on that.
Usually would say get a 6 and learn on it, but these days even those are way too powerful to learn on.
My first street bike was a GSX-R1100 (BIG mistake), and I'd been riding dirt bikes
my whole life.
I've had two friends killed and to be honest, the bikes were too much for them.

Nice Bike BTW

helotaxi
08-10-2006, 08:02 PM
I AGREE. find a 500 and learn on that.
Usually would say get a 6 and learn on it, but these days even those are way too powerful to learn on.
Get a 600 if you are looking for a sport bike, just don't get one of the new repli-racers. Find one a few years old. They don't hold their value very well and should be much cheaper. Also since it isn't new, it won't turn your stomach as bad when you drop it. The savings on the bike itself can cover some of the insurance costs. I have a Harley and a 600 Triumph Speed Four, a naked bike based on the TT600 which was considered pretty anemic by sporting 600 standards. Insurance for the Harley runs me a whole $350 a year and the Triumph sets me back close to $1200. I'm 31 and married with a stable job, good credit and a perfect driving record. I've also completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider course (10% discount) and get a discount for multiple vehicles. If you are under 25 plan on paying a mint.

mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 08:06 PM
Notice teh sweet custom paint :cool: . Soon, alot of the black plastic will be painted red...an the rims are goin to be the same color red as well:yumyum: . And the whole tail section...itl be sweet, nothing will look like it either.

kngadrok
08-10-2006, 08:12 PM
I've also completed the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Basic Rider course
Excellent idea, even for the experienced rider

j3bus2k3
08-10-2006, 08:13 PM
Excellent idea, even for the experienced rider

x2. Track days are a riot too. I've done my fair share; its the only way I could afford the insurance on my bike.

kngadrok
08-10-2006, 08:17 PM
/\It seems everyone in FL is going with the extended swingarm-You?



Notice teh sweet custom paint . Soon, alot of the black plastic will be painted red...an the rims are goin to be the same color red as well . And the whole tail section...itl be sweet, nothing will look like it either.

Dont think I've seen that Setup, should be sweet.

PICS--when you get it done.

BassTurd
08-10-2006, 08:20 PM
Good looking bike but you need to get rid of that shovel hanging off the back. You ever check out www.gixxer.com? Lots of good info on there.


For helotaxi: $1200 a month on that Triumph? Holy crap! I only pay $19 a month on my GSXR600 K5 and I'm 26 and single, and I've wrecked the bike once. I know the area you're in can change how much you have to pay, but ****! That sounds high. Tried checking out any other companies? I go through State Farm.

j3bus2k3
08-10-2006, 08:22 PM
/\It seem everyone in FL is going with the extended swingarm-You?

Hell no...I roll with a single-sided swingarm :yumyum: . But yea, I've seen extensions with 300 size tires on everything from 600RR to Hayabusas...

http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/497/767805833rk3.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

kngadrok
08-10-2006, 08:23 PM
Good looking bike but you need to get rid of that shovel hanging off the back.
:D

mannyb18b
08-10-2006, 09:20 PM
It helps soak up teh rubber

Savstyle
08-11-2006, 12:01 AM
YES, DONT DO IT. Seriously man, these things are insanely fast. The absolute BEST advice I can give you is buy something like a ninja 250/500, learn how to ride properly on it. Learner bikes have good re-sale value, so sell it an then step up to a street bike.
Problem is, when you first do ANYTHING, you make mistakes, an you learn from them. thats how you get better. But on a newer street bike, 600+ especially 06+ cuz they just keep getting faster, mistakes are not so forgiving :drool: < u dont wanna look like that on the side of the road

haha thas what my friend told me, a couple days before my cousin he would teach to ride but i don wanna learn on his bike, He has a suped up hayubusa and ive seen how fast that **** is i aint tryin to ride it.

LoudCrownVic
08-11-2006, 12:07 AM
I have a Yahama 225 onroad offroad bike... Gets about 80-85mpg.

It only weighs about 200lbs, basically a glorified bycicle.. Great learner. If I changed the sprockets I could prolly keep up with a 'Busa to 45mph :) But I'm happy as hell with it.

90accordman
08-11-2006, 12:17 AM
I wanted one bad, then my cousin layed his Hayabusa down and ripped all the skin off his leg and right side of his body. Honestly im scared as hell to ride one now, because hes a skilled rider and im not.

kngadrok
08-11-2006, 09:25 AM
After my third wreck on the street and having all the skin ripped off both arms, I decided to change surfaces--


Only to tear my rotator cuff & crush my ball Joint (was layed up for 10 months)
But I am going riding today.;)

helotaxi
08-11-2006, 08:03 PM
For helotaxi: $1200 a month on that Triumph? Holy crap! I only pay $19 a month on my GSXR600 K5 and I'm 26 and single, and I've wrecked the bike once.
That's per year for full coverage (there's a loan on it) with no deductible. Close to $1k of that is for the collision coverage. Rare bike so parts are hard to come by.

layed his Hayabusa down
because hes a skilled riderThose two statements don't exactly go together. There is experience and there is skill. The first does not automatically grant the second. I would say at least 90% of the people on 'busas have more bike under them than their skill can honestly handle. I have yet to hear an explanation approaching logical for have a bike that quick and fast on the road. My anemic Triumph can do 0-illegal faster than pretty much any factory car and the 'busa is close to 2 sec faster in the quarter mile than it is. What's the point? If they were at least uncommon then there might be an argument along the lines of having something semi unique along the lines of having a Ferrari, but they're nothing special in that respect. If they were practical transportation and got good gas mileage or were easy to manage in traffic or around town I could understand having one but they are none of the above.

mannyb18b
08-11-2006, 09:48 PM
I know some of the most skilled riders I have ever seen or met, and they lay **** down. Doesn't really matter mayne

kngadrok
08-11-2006, 09:50 PM
There is experience and there is skill. The first does not automatically grant the second. I would say at least 90% of the people on 'busas have more bike under them than their skill can honestly handle.

:clap:

mannyb18b
08-11-2006, 09:51 PM
90% of the poeple out there on street bikes have more bike under them than there skill can handle. But hey thats the fun in it rright...lol

bigbangtheory
08-12-2006, 09:02 AM
Hell no...I roll with a single-sided swingarm :yumyum: . But yea, I've seen extensions with 300 size tires on everything from 600RR to Hayabusas...

http://img144.imageshack.us/img144/497/767805833rk3.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

That is da sexiness right derr!:yumyum:

Also nice bike Manny and good advice to the one guy looking to get into riding. I used to have a Honda Hurricane 1100 back in the day. I almost wrecked it coming off a bypass onto the freeway. Basically I went over a pothole and it swayed me to one side, then to the other and I was doing about 45. It scarred the **** out of me and I sold it later that month. Now, almost 9 years later I want to ride again. :( Figures!

helotaxi
08-12-2006, 11:19 AM
I know some of the most skilled riders I have ever seen or met, and they lay **** down. Doesn't really matter mayne

On the track or on the street? The track is a whole different story, one that is all about finding your skill limit and riding right to it and trying to push the limit knowing that you don't have to worry about coming around the curve and finding a pothole or gravel on the apex or some prick in a minivan talking on the cellphone turning left in front of you.

If you ride anywhere near your physical limit on the street, you are proving that you don't have the mental ability to ride a fast bike on the street. These are the guys that think that they are skilled but lack the wisdom to realize that the street is not a controlled environment and that even though they might be able to ride at a certain pace and push their ability, they have not left a margin of safety for the unexpected things that pop up on public roads, like the public.

Any person who is not a professional racer (even they wreck on the track) and thinks that they can fully handle the bike that they are on, is most cetainly mistaken. Hopefully they will get their reality check in the form of a scare and not in the form of a serious crash. I find it easy to pick out the newer riders that have square head on their shoulders. They get a 600 semi-sport (not the newest repli-racer) street bike. They take the MSF course. They recognize their lack of ability and make sure that they ride within it and leave a large safety margin for the unexpected. They ride every chance they get to build up their skill set. And this last is the most important, they never lose respect for the relative power and acceleration that is part and parcel with a sporty bike. They fool themselves into thinking that they have fully mastered the machine that they ride. My MSF instructor had been riding for longer than I have been alive and he rode a GSX-R 600. He was very much ofthe opinon that there was no need for anything more on the street and that the liter bikes and the super bikes like the 'busa are wholly pointless. You can't get everything a 600 class has to offer on the street so what's the point of sacrificing handling and going with a less agile bike, while paying more (in price, insurance and gas) for even more that you can't use?

mannyb18b
08-12-2006, 02:07 PM
^ yes...nice, I very much agree.

But also I was talking about on the street, but I am apart of a large MC, SBFreaks, they created the videos called Servin it up and Servin it up 2. So I see alot of things, but it all comes down to one thing an thats the love for riding. These guys just like to do special k's while doin it lol

j3bus2k3
08-12-2006, 02:10 PM
On the track or on the street? The track is a whole different story, one that is all about finding your skill limit and riding right to it and trying to push the limit knowing that you don't have to worry about coming around the curve and finding a pothole or gravel on the apex or some prick in a minivan talking on the cellphone turning left in front of you.

If you ride anywhere near your physical limit on the street, you are proving that you don't have the mental ability to ride a fast bike on the street. These are the guys that think that they are skilled but lack the wisdom to realize that the street is not a controlled environment and that even though they might be able to ride at a certain pace and push their ability, they have not left a margin of safety for the unexpected things that pop up on public roads, like the public.

Any person who is not a professional racer (even they wreck on the track) and thinks that they can fully handle the bike that they are on, is most cetainly mistaken. Hopefully they will get their reality check in the form of a scare and not in the form of a serious crash. I find it easy to pick out the newer riders that have square head on their shoulders. They get a 600 semi-sport (not the newest repli-racer) street bike. They take the MSF course. They recognize their lack of ability and make sure that they ride within it and leave a large safety margin for the unexpected. They ride every chance they get to build up their skill set. And this last is the most important, they never lose respect for the relative power and acceleration that is part and parcel with a sporty bike. They fool themselves into thinking that they have fully mastered the machine that they ride. My MSF instructor had been riding for longer than I have been alive and he rode a GSX-R 600. He was very much ofthe opinon that there was no need for anything more on the street and that the liter bikes and the super bikes like the 'busa are wholly pointless. You can't get everything a 600 class has to offer on the street so what's the point of sacrificing handling and going with a less agile bike, while paying more (in price, insurance and gas) for even more that you can't use?

Very well said! :clap: :thumbsup: :toast: