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96civ
07-13-2006, 06:02 PM
OK I have my glass molds of the body of the car (for kickpanels, of course), made the baffles for the 6.5" and tweeters, and got everything ready up to this point: aligning the baffles for sound imaging, wrapping fleece around the mold, etc... but I've ran into a question I had about the proj.... When wrapping the fleece around the baffles, should I make it so the tweeter and 6.5 have their own separate air space? If I do give them each a separate air space, how much volume should I include for the 6.5 and tweeter or does it make a huge difference?

theothermike
07-13-2006, 09:35 PM
not really neccessary tweets need little to no air space. sooo really the woof would hog it all :-).

azbass
07-13-2006, 09:40 PM
the tweet is sealed. it does not need air space...

theothermike
07-13-2006, 11:05 PM
o maybe thats what people mean by no air space is required. thx i learned something 4 today azbass

96civ
07-13-2006, 11:30 PM
I didn't know that either, makes perfect sense though. Thanks az.

96civ
07-16-2006, 02:44 PM
OK I'm attempting to aim the speakers... should I go for the middle of the headrest, or try to?

blue93corsica
07-16-2006, 02:46 PM
ya that will work, i either go for the headrest area or aim both at the dome light right in the center

96civ
07-16-2006, 02:47 PM
OK cuz I dont think I will be able to experience the imaging at the current setting because the dowel rod supports won't speaker and baffle, and I would hate to aim them incorrectly and have horrible quality.

mobileaudio219
07-16-2006, 07:01 PM
OK cuz I dont think I will be able to experience the imaging at the current setting because the dowel rod supports won't speaker and baffle, and I would hate to aim them incorrectly and have horrible quality.

That'll get you somewhat close.... The best way is trial and error, but that takes alot of time and know how... If youre just going for decent then shoot for the domelight or the headrest on the other side.

squeak9798
07-16-2006, 07:11 PM
A lot of people actually start by aiming the speakers at the rear of the headunit, where the speakers are essentially firing straight across the car at each other. Reason for this is that each speaker will be more equally off axis to both listeners, thus creating better frequency response and equalizing intensity differences from both speakers at the listening position.

But really, there's no one best technique, and it's really vehicle and speaker dependent to begin with. Main thing to do is get them hooked up in the car and start playing with the aiming. To really aim them to the best possible position, it takes a lot of time just sitting in the car and listening to them aimed to different positions.

96civ
07-16-2006, 09:06 PM
Main thing to do is get them hooked up in the car and start playing with the aiming. To really aim them to the best possible position, it takes a lot of time just sitting in the car and listening to them aimed to different positions.
How would I go about listening to the speakers without imposing them into free-air? Wrap them in fleece or a t-shirt like you would before you glass them or is there another tricky way of doing so?

squeak12
07-16-2006, 10:52 PM
Place a pillow type filling or poly fil behind them.

squeak9798
07-17-2006, 05:41 PM
How would I go about listening to the speakers without imposing them into free-air? Wrap them in fleece or a t-shirt like you would before you glass them or is there another tricky way of doing so?


Most people just stuff a lot of towels around the speakers.

Main thing to do is try to keep the rearwave from interacting with the frontwave.

96civ
07-17-2006, 11:42 PM
OK I have a lot of towels at this place so I'll use that method instead of polyfil, for I have no polyfil at the moment.

How will I be able to tell which alignment (as in direction) for the speakers is optimum for imaging, like what kind of songs/tracks should I be listening to in order to setup the stage?

96civ
07-18-2006, 05:17 PM
Last question I hope... would I be alright if I ran speaker wire down the same side of the car that I have the RCA cables, or do you think it would accumulate noise?

helotaxi
07-18-2006, 06:07 PM
Induced noise is not a large problem in car audio despite the prevailing myths and the marketing hype of the cable manufactures. You can definitely run the speaker wire and RCAs together.

squeak9798
07-18-2006, 06:19 PM
:word:

At one point in time I had two sets of speaker wires, two pair of RCA's, 4ga power wire and the REM wire all zip tied together for the entire length of my family sized 4-door sedan....and had absolutely zero noise issues.

Insomniac119
07-18-2006, 09:13 PM
Last question I hope... would I be alright if I ran speaker wire down the same side of the car that I have the RCA cables, or do you think it would accumulate noise?

That's what I always do and never had any problems. You're just not suppost to run any signal wires along the power wires.

helotaxi
07-18-2006, 10:37 PM
You're just not suppost to run any signal wires along the power wires.
This is a car audio myth that has no science to back it up.

96civ
07-18-2006, 11:32 PM
This is a car audio myth that has no science to back it up.
Couldn't the electric fields created by the current possibly interfere with the signal? I mean that's scientific evidence that it could, but I'm not saying it interferes MUCH just some. And thanks for the speedy reply. I should be getting my Profile AP1000 amplifier tomorrow so we'll see how it sounds at where I've aimed the speakers.

helotaxi
07-19-2006, 01:03 AM
For there to be interference, there would have to be a fluctuating current going through the power wire (AC). Since the power in your car is DC there is not a problem. Also consider that if you use a chassis ground for your amps, your chassis is now a power wire. Don't have to separate the signal wire from the chassis do you?

96civ
07-19-2006, 05:29 PM
For there to be interference, there would have to be a fluctuating current going through the power wire (AC).
You still get electric fields from DC, but does it absolutely have to fluctuate direction back and forth in order to create noise?


Also consider that if you use a chassis ground for your amps, your chassis is now a power wire. Don't have to separate the signal wire from the chassis do you?
No, but a ground is attached to the car because the car has 0 potential difference so that when you attach it to a lead filled with electrons, you get current. Therefore shouldn't the car be able to move the electrons from a power source attached to it to the ground very quickly -- so that the car itself does not become charged?

helotaxi
07-19-2006, 10:23 PM
You still get electric fields from DC, but does it absolutely have to fluctuate direction back and forth in order to create noise?A static mag field will not cause noise. Noise is induced current in the signal line. To induce current it has to fluctuate. If it didn't you could induce current in a wire by placing a magnet next to it and you would be able to make free power.



No, but a ground is attached to the car because the car has 0 potential difference so that when you attach it to a lead filled with electrons, you get current. Therefore shouldn't the car be able to move the electrons from a power source attached to it to the ground very quickly -- so that the car itself does not become charged?
The chassis does not have zero potential though. It has resistance and therefore has potential. The only point of zero potential is the negative battery post. All current has to flow there. The chassis is nothing more than a conductor, and not a very good one for that matter.

96civ
07-20-2006, 12:32 AM
I rest my case in that you know a lot more about this than I do helotaxi and having me babbling on about this further would lead to nothing since you're most likely correct lol. I have gotten the amp installed, power, ground, remote, rca, and ran speaker wires down one side (need more wire for the other side)... now all I have to do is hook up the speaker wire to the crossover to the amp and see how they sound. If this alignment doesn't work (approx. middle head rest) I'm going to try the rear of the head-unit. We'll see how everything gooesss.

96civ
07-23-2006, 12:50 AM
A lot of people actually start by aiming the speakers at the rear of the headunit, where the speakers are essentially firing straight across the car at each other. Reason for this is that each speaker will be more equally off axis to both listeners, thus creating better frequency response and equalizing intensity differences from both speakers at the listening position.
I tried a few different alignments for the components, and this is the one that I found to provide the most realistic stage. Anywhere else I found that either the stage wouldn't be as wide or the highs became to harsh. Sounds pretty darn good now if I do say so.