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AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 04:17 AM
I'm looking for a book to walk me through the details of designing and building HT stuff. I want to learn how to pick driver, design and build crossovers, read response graphs etc etc etc. Basically I'd like to read the book a couple times over and be able to buy and build my own speakers for a HT with the confidence that I picked the right speakers, built the right boxes and that my Xovers are exactly what is needed....

ballstothewall
04-27-2006, 10:00 AM
I just got my Loudspeaker Design Cookbook yesterday, it seems like it has a ton of info in it, you might look into one... I can't say to much, I've only been able to skim and read here and there in it sofar.

joetama
04-27-2006, 12:15 PM
The book of experimentation and hard knocks is the one I read LOL. I’ll post a serious one up here in a minute or two....

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 03:54 PM
I'm looking for a book to walk me through the details of designing and building HT stuff. I want to learn how to pick driver, design and build crossovers, read response graphs etc etc etc. Basically I'd like to read the book a couple times over and be able to buy and build my own speakers for a HT with the confidence that I picked the right speakers, built the right boxes and that my Xovers are exactly what is needed....

There are two paths to choose. Pick one.

1. I want to make a well engineered loudspeaker.

2. I want to make a loudspeaker that satisfies my audio desires.

If you choose path 1 then buy books and study theory.

If you choose path 2 then you'd have to email me to learn the black sheep way,
but it requires time and money. This method is akin to MMORPG, online role
playing games like WOW, where power gamers power level characters,
difference is, you'd be doing all the work, I'd just be showing you the power
leveling methodology. :) .. You can still do option 1, but you don't need to dig deep.

joetama
04-27-2006, 04:01 PM
Or you could choose to do it right and go with number 1.

AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 04:46 PM
well the reason for wanting to go with #1 is that I don't have money right now to experiment (college student) but I have LOTS of time to burn... so I could buy a book, read it a couple times and when the money comes I'd be ready to make truly informed decisions...

AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 04:47 PM
I just got my Loudspeaker Design Cookbook yesterday, it seems like it has a ton of info in it, you might look into one... I can't say to much, I've only been able to skim and read here and there in it sofar.

I saw that one but it's spendy... I don't want to buy it unless there is no better, cheaper alternative...

I'm ebaying it.. maybe I can find it cheaper

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 04:53 PM
Or you could choose to do it right and go with number 1.

If properly engineered loudspeakers guaranteed results, then I wouldn't
be doing any DIY. I'd walk into the store, audition, pick the winner and
have mental peace forever.

Turns out, I haven't been able to pick a winner, hence DIY is the only
path for me. Option 1 doesn't work in my case.

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 04:56 PM
well the reason for wanting to go with #1 is that I don't have money right now to experiment (college student) but I have LOTS of time to burn... so I could buy a book, read it a couple times and when the money comes I'd be ready to make truly informed decisions...

You can learn alot with.

1. one amplifier channel
2. simple active crossover {complex active crossover ideal}
3. cheap drivers
4. cheap source

This would power level you to level 20 of 60 :)

AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 05:14 PM
You can learn alot with.

1. one amplifier channel
2. simple active crossover {complex active crossover ideal}
3. cheap drivers
4. cheap source

This would power level you to level 20 of 60 :)

I would love to give this a shot... now where to find active Xovers for home audio... hmm...

joetama
04-27-2006, 05:16 PM
If properly engineered loudspeakers guaranteed results, then I wouldn't
be doing any DIY. I'd walk into the store, audition, pick the winner and
have mental peace forever.

Turns out, I haven't been able to pick a winner, hence DIY is the only
path for me. Option 1 doesn't work in my case.

Haha, well you know you should really sell your speakers then. Reason being if you can make something better than a team of engineers with millions of $$$$$ to play with then you must be the ****. Unless of course you want that thing called volume.

AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 05:22 PM
Haha, well you know you should really sell your speakers then. Reason being if you can make something better than a team of engineers with millions of $$$$$ to play with then you must be the ****. Unless of course you want that thing called volume.

well he can find what works for his ears best... besides it makes a great hobby.... and at least in the short run cheaper...

joetama
04-27-2006, 05:29 PM
well he can find what works for his ears best... besides it makes a great hobby.... and at least in the short run cheaper...

Buy the book, and learn then you can make a good loudspeaker system.

You would hope the guys who build nuclear bombs read up a little before they started building wouldn't you???

AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 05:48 PM
Buy the book, and learn then you can make a good loudspeaker system.

You would hope the guys who build nuclear bombs read up a little before they started building wouldn't you???

I really don't have a choice... $50 is going to be a little of a strectch for me right now but I'm craving the knowledge... so I'll buy the book and read away

joetama
04-27-2006, 05:49 PM
Check your college of engineering library they might have some good books.

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 05:59 PM
I would love to give this a shot... now where to find active Xovers for home audio... hmm...

$250 gets you the Behringer DCX2496 digital crossover.

$120 gets you a Beringer very limited analog crossover, but good enough to get
your hands dirty.

$40 gets you a car audio crossover that requires an AC to DC adapter, but
you can make it work.

You can skew those numbers around by changing brands, but that is the
general price range. You don't need $500 - $3000 crossovers to get started.
I'm not afraid to use the $250 digital crossover in the most expensive design
either.

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 06:03 PM
Haha, well you know you should really sell your speakers then. Reason being if you can make something better than a team of engineers with millions of $$$$$ to play with then you must be the ****. Unless of course you want that thing called volume.

Random thoughts.

*I'm not interested in starting a business to manufacturer and sell product.

*If you like my audio style, then you will love my speaker ideas, if not then
you won't.

*Team of engineers with $$$ to spend doesn't guarantee results. To prove this,
go audition every loudspeaker and tell them they are all great, so great
that you will replace your current setup.... doesn't work that way, you chose
your loudspeaker based on listening tests right? A winner was chosen for your budget. If you chose your loudspeaker, not by listening, but by marketing influences and assumptions that there is nothing better, then that is the wrong
method.

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 06:06 PM
You would hope the guys who build nuclear bombs read up a little before they started building wouldn't you???

This analogy is wrong as there is no absolutes in human perception of audio.
Bombs are absolute, they all go kabooom.... :)

joetama
04-27-2006, 06:10 PM
I'm just not a fan of the propaganda and think people should be educated right and that there is more than "does that **** bump" or does it just sound ok. There is more than just throwing a speaker in a box and getting lucky there is knowing why it works.

I think we should just agree to disagree....On about everything…..

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 06:36 PM
I'm just not a fan of the propaganda and think people should be educated right and that there is more than "does that **** bump" or does it just sound ok. There is more than just throwing a speaker in a box and getting lucky there is knowing why it works.

I think we should just agree to disagree....On about everything…..

You can use option 2 to accellerate the learning and still use option 1
as a foundation, but there is instant satsifaction when you do #2 {lol}.

Do you want to read a book for a year to learn how to work on a car engine
or do you want to take it apart instantly and get your hands greasy?
You can still learn theory, but there is more satisfaction when the wrench
is in your hand.

In the industry that I work in, what appears to be a smart engineer is really
not if that person has no hands on experience. Book worms are not
productive in this line of business. My friend has a MSEE and can't design
a simple circuit to turn on an LED much less design something interesting, yet
he spent 7 years getting that degree. I can tell you more stories, but the clever
folks are the ones working with stuff and managing both variables well.

If I was hiring people for a stereo business, I'd hire car audio guys because
car audio involves alot of hands on DIY. I wouldn't hire some punk out of school
with a degree that never seen an amp.

AcidicDreams
04-27-2006, 08:00 PM
except option 1 is $40 right now, which is all I have for at least a couple months... I'd def go for option 2 once I have some more cash

thylantyr
04-27-2006, 10:33 PM
Option 3 - no money down {lol}

Go to every audio store and audition music familar to you, ideally play the same
CD over and over again. If you have to drive far to hit up the high end stores then
do so. Take notes on each system, examine the speakers, driver types used, and
take notes on how much watts was running the system. Calibrate your brain and get
burn't out on listening to store bought loudspeakers.

Crossroads;
1. If you find loudspeakers that totally satisfy you and they are in reach pricewise,
then stop right here and just buy store bought. Don't pass GO and collect
the $200 DIY prize money.

2. If you can't find something awesome within your price range, then your
only choice is to learn to DIY speakers, but it takes some time to get the hang
of it, I'd say maybe 3 months if you follow my lead assuming you have your
'test bench' setup and an R&D budget for driver samples.
Last, there is woodworking tools and skills that need attention
also.

req
04-27-2006, 11:21 PM
Buy the book, and learn then you can make a good loudspeaker system.

You would hope the guys who build nuclear bombs read up a little before they started building wouldn't you???

but you really have to remember, the word "entrepreneur" does not mean "to start a buisness that makes the best product possible", it means "somone who organizes a buisness, takes a risk, invests his\her money, in order to make the best profit possible."

so you have take in account, these companies are trying to make money off you for their billions of dollars spent. the people who make nuclear do not work to supply a customer, they work for the government, and failure\error is not an option.

otherwise, boston acoustics would be making awesome speakers that you would use, wouldnt they?

this kid wants to learn, and he does not have a lot of money, and thats what HT companies want. money.

what you need to do man, is get the book, and read it. and if you can, and if THY wants to - talk to him too. the more info you can gather in your brain from mutiple sources, and then apply to real situations is what matters.

a compliment of HANDS ON WORK and THEORY are what REAL engineering is about.

joetama
04-28-2006, 12:26 AM
I was just trying to say that reading the book is a good place to start to get a good knowlage of things. Then get your hands dirty. It's not about making money. It's about knowlage.

thylantyr
04-28-2006, 01:19 AM
Make sure you bring this DVD when you audition store product.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0008KLVXC/qid=1146201009/sr=11-1/ref=sr_11_1/103-6102134-0162232?n=130

Empties the room quickly so you have it all to yourself.

AcidicDreams
04-28-2006, 04:18 AM
Option 3 - no money down {lol}

Go to every audio store and audition music familar to you, ideally play the same
CD over and over again. If you have to drive far to hit up the high end stores then
do so. Take notes on each system, examine the speakers, driver types used, and
take notes on how much watts was running the system. Calibrate your brain and get
burn't out on listening to store bought loudspeakers.

Crossroads;
1. If you find loudspeakers that totally satisfy you and they are in reach pricewise,
then stop right here and just buy store bought. Don't pass GO and collect
the $200 DIY prize money.

2. If you can't find something awesome within your price range, then your
only choice is to learn to DIY speakers, but it takes some time to get the hang
of it, I'd say maybe 3 months if you follow my lead assuming you have your
'test bench' setup and an R&D budget for driver samples.
Last, there is woodworking tools and skills that need attention
also.


I'd go broke driving to portland