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View Full Version : Where to find 1" MDF?



JL12W7INAGS300
04-09-2006, 01:22 AM
I am tired of double baffling, its a ***** and a half. I can't find 1" MDF anywhere, if and where do you guys buy this stuff at? Thanks

swc204
04-09-2006, 01:24 AM
lumber yards around here have it. Just go look in the yellow section of the phone book and start calling lumber yards to see if they have any.

req
04-09-2006, 02:25 AM
3\4 + 3\4 + flushmount sub = teh sexaay.

buy a router. you will thank me.

oxsign
04-09-2006, 02:50 AM
3\4 + 3\4 + flushmount sub = teh sexaay.

buy a router. you will thank me.Not to crash, but what router bit is needed to achive that??:crap:

thai_creeper
04-09-2006, 02:58 AM
what does flush mount mean?

JL12W7INAGS300
04-09-2006, 03:29 AM
I have a router... and a circle jig, its just annoying having to do everything twice

thai_creeper
04-09-2006, 05:02 AM
cant u glue em together and cut at once?

btnhfan
04-09-2006, 08:54 AM
Special order at home depot I believe.

JL12W7INAGS300
04-09-2006, 12:27 PM
3\4 + 3\4 + flushmount sub = teh sexaay.

buy a router. you will thank me.


What would be the point of flush mounting when the whole reason behind the double baffle is that the sub has more wood to hold on to?

bjfish11
04-09-2006, 01:23 PM
What would be the point of flush mounting when the whole reason behind the double baffle is that the sub has more wood to hold on to?
I think the whole point is to stop flexing. Am i right?

JL12W7INAGS300
04-09-2006, 01:24 PM
yes, that is also one of the reasons for a double baffle

mazdakid
04-09-2006, 01:25 PM
What would be the point of flush mounting when the whole reason behind the double baffle is that the sub has more wood to hold on to?
ya i thought about flush mounting mine, but then thought the same thing you just said

swimfreak26
04-09-2006, 02:42 PM
What would be the point of flush mounting when the whole reason behind the double baffle is that the sub has more wood to hold on to?
That's not the point of double baffling ;)

The reason for double baffling in most cases is to stop the box from flexing, which will still happen considering the two baffles act as a single piece despite where the sub is.

The small gain you do get in the amount of wood to "hold on to" is actually probably better flush mounting considering that the entire ring has a place to "sit."

bimma85
04-09-2006, 02:46 PM
more reasons you shouldnt be selling boxes ;) :crap:

swimfreak26
04-09-2006, 03:03 PM
I think the whole point is to stop flexing. Am i right?
You're absolutely correct.

Though pressure is distributed evenly in a space given time, at any specific moment - due to the movement of the cone - the front and the back of the box experience the greatest outward pressure, so double baffling can help to aleviate some of the flexing of the wood that's caused by this.

In a ported box you can generally get away with doubling just the front (if flexing is a problem) because there is a port - generally- originating near the back of the box, which allows the pressure to escape, lowering the stress on that portion of the box. The front of the box still experiences an inward pressure from the temporary "vacuum-like" moment when the air is pushed out of the box, then experiences an opposite, outward, pressure when the cone moves the opposite direction allowing air back in. In a properly designed enclosure though, port velocity is minimized and this effect is therefore minimized to the momentary pressure differential within the enclosure.

In a sealed enclosure, no air is leaving or entering the box so by having instantaneous moments of increased outward pressure on the front or back you get an inward pressure on the opposite side, making flexing a bit more prevalent. In a sealed box, if flexing becomes an issue, you should double up more than just the front.

With all of that said, in general flexing does not USUALLY become a problem. You've got to be moving a lot of air and have long stretches of wood that are not braced, which any well constructed box will not have.

JL12W7INAGS300
04-09-2006, 03:13 PM
more reasons you shouldnt be selling boxes ;) :crap:


jesus bimma could you be even more of an *******, look at what bjfish said and look at my responce.

JL12W7INAGS300
04-09-2006, 03:14 PM
You're absolutely correct.

Though pressure is distributed evenly in a space given time, at any specific moment - due to the movement of the cone - the front and the back of the box experience the greatest outward pressure, so double baffling can help to aleviate some of the flexing of the wood that's caused by this.

In a ported box you can generally get away with doubling just the front (if flexing is a problem) because there is a port - generally- originating near the back of the box, which allows the pressure to escape, lowering the stress on that portion of the box. The front of the box still experiences an inward pressure from the temporary "vacuum-like" moment when the air is pushed out of the box, then experiences an opposite, outward, pressure when the cone moves the opposite direction allowing air back in. In a properly designed enclosure though, port velocity is minimized and this effect is therefore minimized to the momentary pressure differential within the enclosure.

In a sealed enclosure, no air is leaving or entering the box so by having instantaneous moments of increased outward pressure on the front or back you get an inward pressure on the opposite side, making flexing a bit more prevalent. In a sealed box, if flexing becomes an issue, you should double up more than just the front.

With all of that said, in general flexing does not USUALLY become a problem. You've got to be moving a lot of air and have long stretches of wood that are not braced, which any well constructed box will not have.

:word:

Crown_amps
04-09-2006, 03:15 PM
Special order at home depot I believe.


i could have swore i saw some at my local home depot man but i could be wrong it was a quick trip

call around use your phone book and call lumber yards like said above