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JL12W7INAGS300
03-15-2006, 08:23 PM
I am starting to plan out my first box build and can't really figure out the debate between liquid nails and wood glue. I was thinking... since I have both avaliable why can't I use wood glue to hold the wood together and liquid nails to seal it up? Thanks

Slowd N Throwd
03-15-2006, 08:26 PM
you could used them both, I like wood glue IMO cheaper and stronger

PowerNaudio
03-15-2006, 08:28 PM
i agree wood glue will work just fine.
i been using titebond 2 drys quick and strong.

BassAce
03-15-2006, 08:33 PM
Seems like quite a bit of people are debating between the two. I wish someone can do a finite element analysis to figure out which is the stronger of the two. My guess would be that wood glue is stronger, but I don't have any "scientific evidence" so to speak to prove that one is superior over another.

.::DuD3::.
03-15-2006, 08:37 PM
id say woodglue. the bond of the wood glue will be stronger than the wood itself.

azbass
03-15-2006, 08:39 PM
wood glue and silicone, end.

PowerNaudio
03-15-2006, 08:39 PM
to tell you the truth, as long as you use glue, screws or brads, and a well braced enclosure. there is realy no need to debate whats better.

if you realy want a realy strong box then seal it with polyester resin as well.

MikeyB
03-15-2006, 08:42 PM
Wood Glue ftw, chemical bondage and then some silicone to ensure the seal! ;)

BassAce
03-15-2006, 08:53 PM
I found a good website about different types of glues.
http://www.trainweb.org/girr/tips/tips5/adhesive_tips.html#latex

Here's what I found if your too lazy to move your finger.




Paper and Wood Adhesives

Wood is an important material in model railroad construction, both in the structure of a layout itself and in buildings and rolling stock. Paper and cardboard are also common materials.

Probably the safest and most common adhesive used in modeling is ordinary white glue. The most common adhesives in this category are called polyvinyl acetates. This is a water based adhesive that adheres well to paper and wood. It is not particularly strong and it is not tolerant to water, but it is cheap and safe. The material dries milky colored. White glue can be diluted with water and sprayed over texturing materials to hold them in place.

Yellow carpenters glue, sometimes called aliphatic resin, is a better choice to bond wood. This adhesive forms a strong bond that is somewhat tolerant of water. This adhesive dries in a somewhat yellow color. Properly made joints are often stronger than the wood that they attach to.

There are more advanced wood adhesives that are waterproof and in general they are stronger that yellow carpenters glue. Some brands names are Liquid Nails and TiteBond II. These adhesives are suitable for use in outdoor wood structures, even in wet environments.









Latex Based Adhesives

Latex is used as a base for some types of adhesives. These are usually fairly strong and reasonably waterproof. Liquid Nails falls in this class. This adhesive is not the strongest of the bunch, but it is usually strong enough and will adhere to wood, metal, glass and masonry and it takes paint very well. Liquid Nails comes in many formulations for specific jobs, but the most applicable is LN-901 exterior grade adhesive. Liquid Nails is available in squeeze tubes or caulking gun tubes. I find that the caulking gun tube is inexpensive (less than $3) and effective as the adhesive is fairly easy to clear from the applicator tip after it has set up. Simply ram the tip out with a metal rod or drill bit and then squirt out the hardened adhesive until fresh adhesive comes out.

A better combination latex and silicone based adhesive is Lexel. Lexel also comes in squeeze tubes and caulking gun tubes but it costs about 3 times as much as Liquid Nails. However, it is stronger, more flexible and has better adhesive strength than Liquid Nails. Lexel comes in white and clear formulations. Lexel also works well in a caulking gun tube. If the tube tip is plugged with a large toothpick or a metal rod, the adhesive will not set up in the tip and the tip is easy to clear. Unlike other silicone adhesives, Lexel will take paint well after it is allowed to set for two days. Lexel adheres to just about anything.

There is also a Lexel formulation called Set N' Stone available that is intended for use with masonry. This is a new product and is not yet widely available.

[Top]



I'd still choose wood glue over liquid nails though, I don't know if this person has credible information, but I'd thought I'd throw that in to stir debate.

HardHittaz00
03-15-2006, 09:15 PM
lol... You've got to be kidding me... Man, from what I've seen on here... It makes no difference... Ur box will be held together, just ur preference... RawDogJ, who won 4th in the world for DB dragging, uses liquid nails... I myself, who am nobody special, use liquid nails, but alot of other people on here use wood glue... I say you flip a quarter, that's about the only way you'll get everything settled...

Vincent9515
03-15-2006, 09:18 PM
I use Titebond II thanks to Moe Lester telling me about it.

Liquid Nails did make some fairly strong bonds that would cause the wood to break before the joint, but I have more confidence in the Titebond II and it's easier to clean, sand, and apply. Ends up costing a bit more unless you build enough to buy the gallon, but well worth it.

Titebond II + finish nailer = efficient and extremely sturdy boxes.

bjfish11
03-15-2006, 10:01 PM
wood glue ftw

Chevyaudio
03-15-2006, 10:05 PM
I use Titebond III

JL12W7INAGS300
03-15-2006, 10:10 PM
So I think I will just go with woodglue to glue the peices together then liquid nails to seal up the seams...

ngsm13
03-15-2006, 10:11 PM
Wood glue hands down.

nG

jimmyjames1700
03-15-2006, 10:40 PM
Alot of people use Liquid Nails incorrectly. It is recommended that you apply the bead to one surface and then firmly press the other surface to it. Then pull them apart and let the adhesive set up for 3-5 minutes before rejoining the two. Most just mash them together, like myself, because we are usually just in to big of a **** hurry.

ramos
03-16-2006, 08:17 AM
I used wood glue to attach panels (make joints), silicon usually to seal if needed. :)

nVRuckus
03-16-2006, 08:30 AM
wood glue and silicone, end.

[/end of debate]

LuNaTiC
03-16-2006, 10:09 AM
How bout the fact I have pretty big gaps in my finished box.... Which is more reliable, Silicon or Liquid nails, For gaps close to 1/4" :P

ramos
03-16-2006, 10:14 AM
I would lean towards silicon as that is what it's meant for :)

ngsm13
03-16-2006, 10:15 AM
I would lean towards silicon as that is what it's meant for :)

Indeed my man. I use the clear ****, cool stuff.

nG

pjm2211
03-16-2006, 10:18 AM
personally I like gorilla glue better than wood glue....but most people on here will say wood glue.

bimma85
03-16-2006, 10:19 AM
wood glue and silicone, end.
/thread after the 5th reply ;)

LuNaTiC
03-16-2006, 10:27 AM
I would lean towards silicon as that is what it's meant for :)

O, I just wasnt sure if it would keeps it's integrity with such a big gap.

ramos
03-16-2006, 10:32 AM
Not sure it will either :)

LuNaTiC
03-16-2006, 04:01 PM
Not sure it will either :)


LOL, It seems to me that liquid nails would be more useful for the gaps because silicone never really gets hard but the liquid does... soooo. iono that's what I thought. BTW silicon *****.

ramos
03-16-2006, 04:03 PM
Nah, it don't ****. Stinks to high heavens though. :D never used liquid nails myself. How hard does it dry ? :)

PV Audio
03-16-2006, 04:49 PM
It's really science that can't be debated...wood glue is stronger, it's made to be so.

PV Audio
03-16-2006, 04:50 PM
LOL, It seems to me that liquid nails would be more useful for the gaps because silicone never really gets hard but the liquid does... soooo. iono that's what I thought. BTW silicon *****.
You should learn about what you're talking before you speak again. Ramos was kind, I'm blunt.

ramos
03-16-2006, 04:51 PM
It's really science that can't be debated...wood glue is stronger, it's made to be so.
Blah hush up :p: somebody tell me how hard liquid nails dries :)

PV Audio
03-16-2006, 04:52 PM
Nah, it don't ****. Stinks to high heavens though. :D never used liquid nails myself. How hard does it dry ? :)
I hate that trash. It may be strong, but it is like thick semen that just gets all over your hand and if you try and wash it off, it thins into a "glove" that is even harder. It dries hard, as in rock hard, but it's flaky. I can't stand it, wood glue is cheaper, stronger, and much easier to use.

PV Audio
03-16-2006, 04:53 PM
Blah hush up :p:
:emb: Sorry. :(

hcoronado
03-16-2006, 05:06 PM
How bout the fact I have pretty big gaps in my finished box.... Which is more reliable, Silicon or Liquid nails, For gaps close to 1/4" :P


if you have gaps that big; it would be best to re-do the box and find some one that can cut straight. ( and i dont mean to be an *** about it).

cutting wood straight vian table saw or skill saw would be the best bet. But out of the two table saw FTW! but if one is not availble you can make straight cuts using the old guiding skill saw trick by overlaping another piece of straight mdf.

wood glue, liquid nails and silicone will not help much unless you add bracing to the entire box.

BTW wood glue FTW

LuNaTiC
03-16-2006, 05:25 PM
You should learn about what you're talking before you speak again. Ramos was kind, I'm blunt.

Meany, But seriusoly I was just kidding. I was referring to how it doesnt keep my sub air tight in the box. The screws are shabby and are coming loose, So I siliconed to keep it sealed and the silicon breaks after < 3 days play. I know I can just re screw new holes but I'm lazy.

Also, The box I built for my 15 has PERFECT cuts, Partly because my step-dad built it with me. I have a car and was in need of a new box, So I had Home Depot cut the sheet for me, For my new box, so I could fit the pieces in my car.

Sooo ya. Back to school.....

Devices 2 FTW!

HardHittaz00
03-16-2006, 06:32 PM
I use Heavy Duty Liquid Nails, and it dries very hard... We used Heady Duty Liquid Nails to hold up mirrors that weigh about 300lbs each... So it's extremly strong stuff, and will seal an enclosure extremly well... Fill in any big or small gaps... I recomend it, but, like I said before, kinda ur preference...

PV Audio
03-16-2006, 09:49 PM
if you have gaps that big; it would be best to re-do the box and find some one that can cut straight. ( and i dont mean to be an *** about it).

cutting wood straight vian table saw or skill saw would be the best bet. But out of the two table saw FTW! but if one is not availble you can make straight cuts using the old guiding skill saw trick by overlaping another piece of straight mdf.

wood glue, liquid nails and silicone will not help much unless you add bracing to the entire box.

BTW wood glue FTW
:confused: How in the hell does not having bracing mean that wood glue won't do much at all? Where do you get this nonsense from?

Vadude
03-16-2006, 10:10 PM
I have never heard of any box comming a part from using niether liquid nails or wood glue.

PV Audio
03-17-2006, 07:31 AM
Because it hasn't, but that isn't the point. Wood glue IS stronger, which really isn't debateable and frankly with some clear window and door silicone, you don't need anything else.

Ignatowski
03-17-2006, 07:48 AM
screws and caulk.....

LuNaTiC
03-17-2006, 09:59 AM
**** and balls.....

JL12W7INAGS300
03-17-2006, 11:52 PM
**** and balls.....

my favorite :crazy:

trevor87
03-17-2006, 11:53 PM
wood glue FTW!!!!