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96civ
11-30-2005, 08:22 PM
I've heard that a square or nearly-square box will not perform as well as a rectangular box. For instance the internal dimensions of my sealed box for a L5 12" Solo baric is 14.5W x 14D x 13.75H (approximately 1.62 cubic feet) which is between the .88 - 2.0 range. What I wanna know is if the dimensions being somewhat close to each other is going to affect the performance of the sub?

406er
11-30-2005, 11:02 PM
the sub dosnt care if the "box" is square, rectangle, a triangle. a tube, or a wedge. it only cares about the internal voulme. and id go a tad bigger. id shoot for 1.8 cu ft NET voulum with the L5. from my experance that seems to be the sweet spot. good bass and good SQ. well as good as an L5 can get!

NhustlaR
11-30-2005, 11:49 PM
the sub dosnt care if the "box" is square, rectangle, a triangle. a tube, or a wedge. it only cares about the internal voulme. and id go a tad bigger. id shoot for 1.8 cu ft NET voulum with the L5. from my experance that seems to be the sweet spot. good bass and good SQ. well as good as an L5 can get!


i'd almost like to argue that, when you get into certain shaped boxes, cancellation can become a problem ;)

HeNry2cOoL
12-01-2005, 02:36 AM
i'd almost like to argue that, when you get into certain shaped boxes, cancellation can become a problem ;)

Would the woofer placement on the box also affect the way the sub operates? So far I came up with a external dimension of 14" x 14" x 16" for a sealed box for my 12" Infinity 1240w that's suppose to give me about 1.31 cuft internal volume. I was wondering if it would be better to mount the woofer on the 'rectangular' side or 'square' side of the box? And would there be any problems with my box dimensions?

flakko
12-01-2005, 02:41 AM
Would the woofer placement on the box also affect the way the sub operates? So far I came up with a external dimension of 14" x 14" x 16" for a sealed box for my 12" Infinity 1240w that's suppose to give me about 1.31 cuft internal volume. I was wondering if it would be better to mount the woofer on the 'rectangular' side or 'square' side of the box? And would there be any problems with my box dimensions?

bah mount it on whichever side you want... it still airspace.

QuikSilverRS91
12-01-2005, 04:05 AM
LoL yeah for the most part Flakko is right... the only thing is if you mount it on the "square" side it might look a little funky.

PowerNaudio
12-01-2005, 08:08 AM
its got some thing to do with the distance the back waves have to travel and bounce from the enclosure walls and back to the back end of the sub. you dont want them to all be coming back at the sub at the same time. you want a delay between the waves coming back. dont quote me on that.
ill find the article and ill post actual facts about the square enclosures.

Pyro_By_Nature
12-01-2005, 09:33 AM
Now all together class, staaaaaaaanding waaaaaaves.

PowerNaudio
12-01-2005, 01:04 PM
tapering the internal corners makes it is possible to eliminate standing waves and resonance common to other speaker enclosures.

Eliminating standing waves also protects the driver from harmful back waves that cause distortion and cone breakup.

For a standing wave to exist, the distance between parallel boundaries must be 1/2 the wavelength of the frequency at which the standing wave exists. Considering that sub-bass waves vary from 56.4 feet (20 Hz) to 11.28 feet (100 Hz),

Three types of standing waves affect all previously manufactured loudspeaker enclosures. The first and most powerful is the axial standing wave. The axial wave involves only two enclosure walls that are parallel to one another. Next in order of strength is the tangential standing wave which involves four enclosure walls that are parallel to one another. This type of standing wave has only half the energy of an axial wave (3db down). The last and least powerful standing wave is the oblique which involves six enclosure walls and it has only one fourth the energy of the axial wave (6db down).

How do standing waves degrade the performance of loudspeakers? A sound wave has a positive portion starting at 0 degrees to 180 degrees and a negative portion starting at 180 degrees. If the positive portion of the wave (i.e. compression) meets the negative portion (i.e. rarefaction), then the waves will combine and will be out of phase relative to each other. Likewise, if the positive portion of the waves meets another positive portion of the wave then the waves are in phase (i.e. the waves reinforce each other) the sound will be inordinately loud (i.e. the high pressure zone). Likewise, at locations in the enclosure where the sound waves are out of phase (one being negative and the other being positive) the sound waves cancel each other out and no sound will be heard (a low or no pressure zone).

edit: i just cut and pasted from searching