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View Full Version : Expanding primer or some filler for fiberglass????



sampson
10-05-2005, 04:05 PM
Hey,

I am building a fiberglass box and it is looking pretty **** good soo far. However I am where I am kinda in the final stages of sanding and bondo... and was wondering how in the hell everyone gets the boxes soo smooth? Are they just really good at bondo, or is there some spray that you use to fill in the little cracks and indents????? I have tried some Napa primer and it ain't doing it and bought some primer that is meant for scratches to help fill them in and that isn't really impressing me much either? So is there some kind of somewhat expanding spray primer I can use on this box to finally finish it off? I heard something about kill or killa or some kinda primer like that, but couldn't find it so where is that stuff, and what does everyone use to get their boxes soo **** smooth and perfect:eyebrow: ? Thanks a lot I really apreciate it-Sampson

Chevyaudio
10-05-2005, 04:09 PM
Spot putty, for small tiny pin holes, and then get a really good high build primer. And rember that high grit sand paper (2000) is your friend.

bjfish11
10-05-2005, 04:34 PM
Yea, i use a polyester putt cote, its like a thinner bondo, so it fills in the small stuff easily. Then shoot a filler primer on it. Go to OReillys, they got everything you need there.

sampson
10-05-2005, 05:01 PM
thanks, but don't have an OReillys around here that I know of, I'll google it really quick, but what is it like auto parts store, or a hardware store or what? As far as the really good high build primer.. what brands do you guys recommend? I would prefer if it was in a can, but I could brush it on via paintbrush if I have to. Thanks a lot for the tips-Sampson

bjfish11
10-05-2005, 05:05 PM
well if you dont have a gun to use, go to wal mart and pick up a few cans of duplicolor high build filler primer. its in a regular spray paint can. It works alright. And OReillys is an auto parts store. But id try that wal mart stuff. Just put many many think coats on. and sand it down good.

sampson
10-05-2005, 09:01 PM
**** was hoping it wouldn't come to that.... I just went down to some local stores and they had the following....

Bondo Fiberglass jelly mix (pretty sure thats not what I'm going for here, but thught I'd list it)
Bondo Hair (bondo with fiberglass strands mixed into it)
Ultimate Premium lightweight brand Body Filler... (thinking this is the one I might try out..... asked the guy behind the counter and he didn't anything... so thought I'd ask if anyone had any experience with it....)

Thanks-Sampson

If that don't work probably gonna end up going with the duplicolor stuff recommended. THanks bjfish11, let me know what you think of the stuff listed above.-Sampson

bjfish11
10-05-2005, 09:40 PM
That body filler would be the only thing worth using in your situration. Id give that a try. But to get out the small holes, your gonna have to either get a glazing putty or filler primer.

ramos
10-06-2005, 08:40 AM
The kill, killa you are talking about is killz primer stain blocker. Works well on MDF but not what you need on body filler. To answer your question you originally asked. Yes most of the body work professionals you see are that good at applying bondo. It takes some practice, and proper technique to minimize sanding and filling. :)

dbornotdb
10-06-2005, 08:49 AM
Forget the jelly and the hair. Go with the regular filler.
Do thin coats, sand it off with 80 thn 150. Thin coat it again and repeat but also add 200. Small pinholes will be fine now.
Use the Duplicolor Gey Filer Primer. Avoid the red colored version. Get plenty of cans, as it is your friend now.
Spray a couple light coats and let it tack. You should be able to see the holes now. Then spray it on thick. Some runs are ok, just don;t overdo it. Pay attention to where the holes are and fill them in as you spray.
Let that dries good. Wet sand with 150, then 220. repeat if needed. When happy with 220 looks, go to 400.
Drie, tack cloth and clean and then paint.

jellyfish420
10-07-2005, 01:15 AM
mix up some resin, then mix up some bondo, then mix it together. make it something like...runny toothpaste. you can paint it on, and it'll fill all the little holes and cracks.

ramos
10-07-2005, 08:08 AM
I tried the milkshake method. ^ It's just not my cup of tea. I have worked right along side people who sware by it and use it very effectivly. I just don't see any time savings over my current methods. :)

jellyfish420
10-07-2005, 08:15 AM
I tried the milkshake method. ^ It's just not my cup of tea. I have worked right along side people who sware by it and use it very effectivly. I just don't see any time savings over my current methods. :)
i've never tried it, but i know alot of people that wouldn't do it any other way.

ramos
10-07-2005, 09:48 AM
Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying it's a bad thing. I personally just find it's not necassary if you take your time with the filler. :)

jellyfish420
10-07-2005, 08:33 PM
Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying it's a bad thing. I personally just find it's not necassary if you take your time with the filler. :)
thats how i do it.i use to work at a body shop so i know how to use filler;)

dbornotdb
10-08-2005, 01:29 PM
After do the initial resining of a box, dash, kicks.......whatever, and then you do the filler, there is no need to do a milkshake over that. That is just working backwards.
Milkshake should be used first if your gonna use it at all.
If you have done filler and have it pretty smooth and only have pinhole, spraying in Filler primer as I described above will work, I don't care what anyone says.
It is really a sprayable filler and coat that stuff on. It sands smooth and fills holes.

ramos
10-10-2005, 08:52 AM
After do the initial resining of a box, dash, kicks.......whatever, and then you do the filler, there is no need to do a milkshake over that. That is just working backwards.
Milkshake should be used first if your gonna use it at all.
If you have done filler and have it pretty smooth and only have pinhole, spraying in Filler primer as I described above will work, I don't care what anyone says.
It is really a sprayable filler and coat that stuff on. It sands smooth and fills holes.



I'm with you brother man, I live and die with high build polyester primer. :)

sampson
10-11-2005, 04:17 AM
ok what do you mean by wet sanding... I'm at the point where i"m about to just paint the **** thing and not give a crap about the little scratches and pin holes. I've heard of wet sanding but is that where you just get the box wet and then sand it with normal sand paper? I'll give that a shot, but let me know soon before I just say screw the whole deal, and paint it now, lol. I just want this thing done-Sampson

ramos
10-11-2005, 08:21 AM
Wet sanding is messy but pretty easy my man. Make sure you have paper made for wet sanding, most is silicon carbide I believe. Soak the paper in some water for a few minutes. Then get you a little squirt bottle fill it up with water and just a few drops of dish soap. Then squirt the water on the area you want to sand, and get to sanding. Use the water to wash away excess crud (wet sanding dust ) to keep the paper cutting clean. THe soap acts as a lubricant and makes the paper glide a little better. :)

KngOfThePkngLot
10-11-2005, 08:22 AM
Wet sanding is messy but pretty easy my man. Make sure you have paper made for wet sanding, most is silicon carbide I believe. Soak the paper in some water for a few minutes. Then get you a little squirt bottle fill it up with water and just a few drops of dish soap. Then squirt the water on the area you want to sand, and get to sanding. Use the water to wash away excess crud (wet sanding dust ) to keep the paper cutting clean. THe soap acts as a lubricant and makes the paper glide a little better. :)
good idea w/ the dish soap...never thought about that.

dbornotdb
10-11-2005, 08:47 AM
As stated above, wet sanding paper is different from your normal paper. It is usually black in color and states on the back "wet/dry".

You can also keep a bucket of warm water beside you and dip the paper in it and keep a sponge in it to bring water to the box to wash off build up.
The soap in the water works two fold. It keep the piece lubricated so it slides across easier and it also continuously cleans the piece to keep oilly build ups off so when painting time comes near, it is cleaner.

Wet sanding can cut out alot of scratches normally found with regular sandpapers.

HOAX_1
10-11-2005, 09:35 AM
Yo Sampson, dont give up on the filler.. Just keep your coats thin and as smooth as possible. Put a coat on, sand. put another coat on, sand.. etc..

sampson
10-11-2005, 01:30 PM
ALright I'll grab some wet sand paper today... can you get it at Wal-Mart or am I gonna have to hit up a hardware store to get it? So far to fill in the wholes I ahve just been been spraying a lot of that Duplicolor primer in and around the hole... it has worked pretty good, but not as good as I want it to. Hopefully I'll wetsand and it will look a ton better. Figuring I'll get some 200 grit then 400.... see how that does. Thanks a lot-Sampson

... and don't worry I'll post up tons of pics of this thing... I have taken quite a few, its actually a pretty **** hard box for me being the first one I have ever done. you'll see why when the pics hit. ;).... Thanks for the help you guys-Sampson

ramos
10-11-2005, 01:43 PM
My local wally world carries it. :)


edit they carry the 3m brand anyway :)

sampson
10-11-2005, 01:46 PM
OK , thats what I'll go with unless a lot of people tell me its crap.... THanks ramos>....

dbornotdb... nice fibrglass page... just checked it out... I hope this wet sanding goes as smooth as everyone says it will-Sampson