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    nofriends46's Avatar
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    Question on Power Distribution Block, Preamp Outputs and Bass Blockers?

    Whats Power Distribution Block, whats that for.. hook it up etc...

    Also my Punch 500a, has preamp outputs, does that mean you can hook up another rca cable to that amp instead of running a Rca cable to your other set of rca to your Head Unit?

    Bass Blockers, do you need like 2 of them, one to postive and one to negative or just one? If you need one, how do you hook that up. If anyone used this, does it really work? Also its says if you want 300hz, 600hz, 800hz etc.. and 4ohm and 8ohm. What is the difference between 300hz and 600hz etc... and 4ohm to 8ohm?

    Thanks!







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    hey well power dist. blocks are used when you have more than one amp
    usually a 4 gauge cable is run into it....and its output connects to lets say 8 gauge cables
    and yes the preouts on the amp can be used to connect another using rcs'a instead of running another set from the deck

    i have never used bass blockers but i might in the near future...are you sure its 300Hz and 400Hz etc ?...cuz thats very high for bass frequencies...maybe its more like 30Hz...40Hz etc...well the difference in those values is that the lower frequencies like 30Hz and 40Hz will give you a lower bass
    the higher the frequency is the higher the bass will sound...not to be confused with louder bass
    you need ONE bass blocker per sub...and usually you can connect it the the positive terminal on the sub
    an ohm is a measurement of resistance...and in this case its the measurement of the speaker's resistance....the lower the resistance means more power will flow through the speaker
    in your case....you need to check if your subs are 8 ohm or 4 ohm
    if they are 4 ohm it means u need to get 4 ohm blockers
    in short....if u had a 4 ohm sub and an 8 ohm sub on the same amp but different channels...the 4 ohm sub will sound louder because it offers less resistance to oppose the current flowing through it

    PS- if anyone else is reading this and i made wrong statements about anything...i stand to be corrected



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    A basic power distribution block is used to split a power wire coming off the battery into several smaller power cables. ie-one 4 awg cable pslit into 2 8 awg cables. If you have multiple amps and/or electronic crossovers a block will come in handy when wiring it all up.
    Also they make more advanced(more expensive)blocks which can have built in circuit brakers and other such fun stuff

    The preamp outputs on your amp are used for connecting several amps together to achieve more power output.

    Never used bass blockers before have always used crossovers but i do know that they act like lp crossovers so whatever Hz the bass blocker is rated for is the lowest freq. which can be passed through to your speakers



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    300hz, 600hz, 800hz etc.. and 4ohm and 8ohm. What is the difference between 300hz and 600hz etc... and 4ohm to 8ohm?
    I've previously used bass blockers and found them quite useful. You take your 300 hz bass blocker that blocks any freq's from 300hz on down @ 4 ohms. Take that same 300 hz blocker and it will block 150hz and down for an 8 ohm speaker. Same with 600hz, blocks 600hz @ 4-ohm, and 300 w/8-ohms. Basically to sum it up, divide it in half if you are running 8-ohms. I'm pretty sure I stated this correctly, but I can't remember for sure, it's been a while, but I do know that it's either less or more for an 8-ohm speaker. Typically you would use 300hz for a 6x9, 600hz for a 6 1/2, and 900 hz for anything smaller. You can use whatever you want but I believe that is recommended. I think I used 900 hz for my 6 1/2's, but I can't really remember. Bass blockers usually come in pairs, so you will need only 1 set per pair of speakers. They work off the positive lead of the speaker.




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    oooopps i just realised i confused bass blockers with bass coils



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    bass blockers block unwanted bass from your coloxal speakers so you can play your music louder without distortion




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    Re: Question on Power Distribution Block, Preamp Outputs and Bass Blockers?

    Bass blockers do block bass out of midrange speakers @ 12 db per octave. This means if you have a 200 hz bass blocker, your speakers will be 12 db down @ 100 hz(1 octave) and 24 db down @ 50 hz(another octave), An octave is a doubling or halving of a given frequency. If you have a 200 hz bass blocker it doesnt mean your speakers wont play anything lower, but it will be alot quiter below the crossover frequency. I wouldnt do such high bass blockers-61/2" I would do 100-150 hz either will work, 51/4 I would do 150-250hz, 4 or 3 300 hz. Just one on the positive speaker lead in series. You were right on the rca preouts on your amp, they are made to hook up another amp without running wires to the head unit or using rca y's. As far as impedence all of your mids should be 4 ohm, so get your blockers for 4 ohm speaks. Hope this helps and doesnt confuse.




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