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    Preferred frequency response curve?

    What curve do you guys prefer?
    I like the smiley face curve for the most part
    Bass slowly sloping down to about 500 with the largest dip around 4k and a shallow rise from 12k up.



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Everyone likes a nice curve



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Oh gosh, let me stop you before this even starts. A curve is based on frequency response and frequency response is not even close to the whole picture. You must take into account things like relative phase, Linear phase, group delay of higher slopes in interaural intensity difference(ITD) frequencies.

    More importantly though, a curve's sound is based on those things as well as the way the measurement is taken. For instance, if i sit in my car and take individuals measurements around my left ear, then take those measurements, average them, and over weeks of tuning, come up with a curve that i like. Guess what, if i put that same exact curve on your car with different measuring techniques; such as taking measurements in different spots around my left ear in your car. I would then have a completely difference sound. This is because of three reasons.

    1.Your initial response before eq will have different phase than mine and when you add your parametric or graphic eq to change that initial response. You will change relative phase in very significant ways. This changes the sounds clarity, and what many would call "attack" and "resolution"

    2. Measurement(s) have to have a linear and repeatable way of recording before they can be considered useful. What my curve looks like would sound terrible in your car because the way that i took the measurements is completely different than the way you took them.

    3. Each car has its own unique reflection, phase response, distortion differences, and comb filtering, and sound absortion. Think of having leather seats instead of vinyl. That kind of thing.

    The only way a curve has any kind of validity is if the measurements are standardized across the board in all factors. Basically. If i sat in a brand new 2018 vehicle with stock everything that included a factory dsp, the tuned it with that dsp for multiple height differences. I could apply that curve to every single factory dsp in that car across the production line and it would sound the same. This is already done in some luxury cars.

    ALL that being said. You can somewhat justify a curve for 0-300hz due to the fact that those wavelengths of those frequencies are longer that most vehicles in production and you can tune to the idea of the Fletcher–Munson curve. Basically its the psycho acoustic idea that we arent sensitive to low freq and we are hyper sensitive to high frequencies(up to about 15k), so if you tune low freq to be loud and high freq to be low. You'll hear everything as having the same loudness..

    https://www.teachmeaudio.com/recordi...munson-curves/




    Gain on an amplifier to meant to be matched to the output voltage of your headunit. Think 3 volt, 4 volt, 5 volt pre out specs you see on headunit specs. This is how gain works for a given pre out(5 volt) theoretically. However most head units clip(start to distort) at around 80% of your volume so your 5 volt pre out wont give 5 volts Cleanly. You will most likely get 4 volts out at something like 33/40 on your volume knob and would thus set your gain to 4 volts. (these things can be measured with a GOOD Multimeter. )
    80% of your total volume is (max volume) X 0.8.
    Example is 40(is your max volume so, 40 X .8=32


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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Camry View Post
    Oh gosh, let me stop you before this even starts. A curve is based on frequency response and frequency response is not even close to the whole picture. You must take into account things like relative phase, Linear phase, group delay of higher slopes in interaural intensity difference(ITD) frequencies.

    More importantly though, a curve's sound is based on those things as well as the way the measurement is taken. For instance, if i sit in my car and take individuals measurements around my left ear, then take those measurements, average them, and over weeks of tuning, come up with a curve that i like. Guess what, if i put that same exact curve on your car with different measuring techniques; such as taking measurements in different spots around my left ear in your car. I would then have a completely difference sound. This is because of three reasons.

    1.Your initial response before eq will have different phase than mine and when you add your parametric or graphic eq to change that initial response. You will change relative phase in very significant ways. This changes the sounds clarity, and what many would call "attack" and "resolution"

    2. Measurement(s) have to have a linear and repeatable way of recording before they can be considered useful. What my curve looks like would sound terrible in your car because the way that i took the measurements is completely different than the way you took them.

    3. Each car has its own unique reflection, phase response, distortion differences, and comb filtering, and sound absortion. Think of having leather seats instead of vinyl. That kind of thing.

    The only way a curve has any kind of validity is if the measurements are standardized across the board in all factors. Basically. If i sat in a brand new 2018 vehicle with stock everything that included a factory dsp, the tuned it with that dsp for multiple height differences. I could apply that curve to every single factory dsp in that car across the production line and it would sound the same. This is already done in some luxury cars.

    ALL that being said. You can somewhat justify a curve for 0-300hz due to the fact that those wavelengths of those frequencies are longer that most vehicles in production and you can tune to the idea of the Fletcher–Munson curve. Basically its the psycho acoustic idea that we arent sensitive to low freq and we are hyper sensitive to high frequencies(up to about 15k), so if you tune low freq to be loud and high freq to be low. You'll hear everything as having the same loudness..

    https://www.teachmeaudio.com/recordi...munson-curves/

    I'm talking strictly about the final frequency response curve. not the cabins acoustics. not the INPUT curve but measure output frequency response of the drivers.



    Insidious Audio

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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by Papermaker85 View Post
    I'm talking strictly about the final frequency response curve. not the cabins acoustics. not the INPUT curve but measure output frequency response of the drivers.
    There is no such thing as an input curve. You're curve is your curve. You're power response is your measured output of your driver in all direction.

    You are completely changing the nature of your question and/or statement.



    Gain on an amplifier to meant to be matched to the output voltage of your headunit. Think 3 volt, 4 volt, 5 volt pre out specs you see on headunit specs. This is how gain works for a given pre out(5 volt) theoretically. However most head units clip(start to distort) at around 80% of your volume so your 5 volt pre out wont give 5 volts Cleanly. You will most likely get 4 volts out at something like 33/40 on your volume knob and would thus set your gain to 4 volts. (these things can be measured with a GOOD Multimeter. )
    80% of your total volume is (max volume) X 0.8.
    Example is 40(is your max volume so, 40 X .8=32


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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Camry View Post
    There is no such thing as an input curve. You're curve is your curve. You're power response is your measured output of your driver in all direction.

    You are completely changing the nature of your question and/or statement.
    You input gain or cut to the raw frequency response to get a target frequency response.



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Which is exactly what i just talked about.



    Gain on an amplifier to meant to be matched to the output voltage of your headunit. Think 3 volt, 4 volt, 5 volt pre out specs you see on headunit specs. This is how gain works for a given pre out(5 volt) theoretically. However most head units clip(start to distort) at around 80% of your volume so your 5 volt pre out wont give 5 volts Cleanly. You will most likely get 4 volts out at something like 33/40 on your volume knob and would thus set your gain to 4 volts. (these things can be measured with a GOOD Multimeter. )
    80% of your total volume is (max volume) X 0.8.
    Example is 40(is your max volume so, 40 X .8=32


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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Camry View Post
    Which is exactly what i just talked about.
    What ur fr looks like?



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Bout tree fidy



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    sub bass toned down, midbass relatively flat, slow roll off starting from 3k down and picking back up at 10khz.



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffdachef View Post
    sub bass toned down, midbass relatively flat, slow roll off starting from 3k down and picking back up at 10khz.
    I can stand the bass loudness as long as the midbass transition is loud enough to fill the transition between the fundamental and harmonic.
    Right now these mids I got from c money are freaking sick. I have 250 to each and they straight up laugh at it.

    ---------- Post added at 08:16 PM ---------- Previous post was at 08:15 PM ----------

    Quote Originally Posted by kcr357 View Post
    Bout tree fidy
    I got you covered!!



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    I only care about what's going on <60hz





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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by THATpurpleKUSH View Post
    I only care about what's going on <60hz

    look here.. when got into actual sound i realized i've been listing to bass mekanik all wrong all these years. you don't know ho much the 80-250hz range make the bass complete! get you a good pair of 10" PA drivers with 400 per side. you will thank me later



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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by Papermaker85 View Post
    I can stand the bass loudness as long as the midbass transition is loud enough to fill the transition between the fundamental and harmonic.
    Right now these mids I got from c money are freaking sick. I have 250 to each and they straight up laugh at it.[COLOR="Silver"]
    For normal listening I actually have the bass in the background and have midbass as the star of the show. I actually have 50hz attenuated by a lot for my own SQ preference.



    09 Sienna Subs : Four Team Ascendant 18s......Sub amp: Two Taramps 15k
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    320 amp Singer alt....... 1 group 34 under the hood 6 group31 agms in the back 560 amp hours total.

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    Re: Preferred frequency response curve?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffdachef View Post
    For normal listening I actually have the bass in the background and have midbass as the star of the show. I actually have 50hz attenuated by a lot for my own SQ preference.
    i set my sub high as i can without drawing the stage rearward its really a level matching issues when you have your phase/time alignment right..
    you have the PWXs sealed? how do they do with the substage when its cranked?

    man @ciaonzo sold me the best sounding PA drivers I've ever heard these things legit play do to 35hz up well into the midrange with ease and sound transparent. alittle dryer than my 6.5s but still very realistic maybe more so than my 6.5s around 250 to 500.. they are super clean even moving more than im comfortable with a midbass moving. lol i wouldn't be suprised if they have 7 ot 8mm xmax



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